Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing

November 10, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing

REMINDER:
Upcoming Webinars:

Saturday, November 19
12 PM Pacific Time
deJoly LaBrier
“All Together Now, a Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing”

deJoly LaBrier was born into a Marine Corps family that was involved in a child sex ring, government experimentation and a sadistic ritualistic cult. In 1988, deJoly began the healing journey toward wholeness while identifying 52+ alter personalities that carried on her life. She is the author of two books, DIARY OF A SURVIVOR IN ART AND POETRY, and ALL TOGETHER NOW, A MULTIPLE’S STORY OF HOPE & HEALING. Today she lives with her partner in the mountains of Northwest Georgia, enjoying the serenity and beauty of nature.

deJoly LaBrier will talk about the methods she used to heal from the effects of ritualized torture, an organized child sex ring, and government experimentation. In her recent book, ALL TOGETHER NOW, A MULTIPLE’S STORY OF HOPE AND HEALING, deJoly writes in detail about the various forms the abuse took. She is grateful that during the early part of her recovery, she was introduced to the 12-Steps of AA, as they have been adapted into other groups.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes Thursday evening November 17, 2011

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org   and give her this information:

1. Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend: “All Together Now, a Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing”
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and a guide and instructions after the registration closes

COST

Webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship (Please remember to factor in the cost of the telephone call if you don’t have a computer headset).

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

UPCOMING WEBINAR

Saturday, December 17
12 pm Pacific Time
Alikina
“Memory & Survivors”

Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’. As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works. We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories. Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered. This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling. She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past. She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinars for Clinicians and Survivors

September 17, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinars for Clinicians and Survivors

Survivorship is pleased to announce a new webinar series for professionals beginning this October. We intend to provide webinars on a regular basis and are currently in the process of applying for CEs. Our speakers are trained professionals in the field with many years of experience both in the practical aspect of working with survivors of Ritual Abuse and Mind Control as well as having been speakers at professional conferences in the past.

Upcoming Professional Webinar:

Saturday, October 8, 2011
noon Pacific Time
Moving through Ritual Abuse and Mind Control
Presenter
: Ginny Fouts, LPC, LMFT

Ginny Fouts, LPC, LMFT, is founder of Innovative Therapies LLC. Mrs. Fouts has worked in the mental health field for 30 years in a variety of settings.  She  has experience helping individuals, couples, adolescents and groups, along with a wide-range of training working with those who have experienced severe trauma.  Over the years she has seen counseling bring healing to many lives and relationships.

The webinar focus will be on how to recognize the signs for these types of traumas and different ways of healing.  We will talk about the different types of programs and how not to get bogged down in the labyrinth of details.  Ginny will discuss some of the different levels of programming so you will recognize in the early stages what levels, as a therapist, to look for and how to know you are making progress.   

Upcoming Professional Webinars
In November Staci Sprout will begin the first in a series of Sexual Ethics Workshops. These Webinars will have CE’s attached. Please do let us know if you would like to be added to the email list for upcoming professional webinars.

Upcoming Webinar (for survivors and professionals):
Saturday, September 17
noon Pacific Time
Memory & Survivors

Presenter: Alikina

Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’  As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works.  We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories.  Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered.  This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past.  She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes the Thursday evening before the webinar

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org   and give her this information:

1. Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and a guide and instructions after the registration closes

COST

Professional Webinars are $50, which will include CEs when they are available.
All other webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship.
The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

FUTURE WEBINARS (survivors and professionals)

Saturday, October 15
10 am Pacific Time (please note change of time)
Neil Brick
“Educating Others about Ritual Abuse”

Neil Brick is a survivor of ritual abuse. He founded S.M.A.R.T.
( http://ritualabuse.us ) a ritual abuse educational research resource with a ritual abuse newsletter and annual conferences. He is a member of the Survivorship Board of Directors. He is an advocate for getting the truth about ritual abuse out to the general public.

The webinar focus will be on how survivors can safely empower themselves by getting the truth out about the reality of ritual abuse to other child abuse survivors and the general public. Different ways of reaching the public and the media will be discussed.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Memory and Survivors

August 30, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Memory and Survivors

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Memory and Survivors

Upcoming Webinar:
Saturday, September 17
noon Pacific Time
Memory & Survivors

Presenter: Alikina

Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’  As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works.  We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories.  Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered.  This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past.  She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes Thursday evening September 15, 2011

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org   and give her this information:

1. Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend: “ Memory & Survivors
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and a guide and instructions after the registration closes

COST

Webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship (Please remember to factor in the cost of the telephone call.)

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

FUTURE WEBINARS

Saturday, October 15
10 am Pacific Time (please note change of time)
Neil Brick
“Educating Others about Ritual Abuse”

Neil Brick is a survivor of ritual abuse. He founded S.M.A.R.T.
( http://ritualabuse.us ) a ritual abuse educational research resource with a ritual abuse newsletter and annual conferences. He is a member of the Survivorship Board of Directors. He is an advocate for getting the truth about ritual abuse out to the general public.

The webinar focus will be on how survivors can safely empower themselves by getting the truth out about the reality of ritual abuse to other child abuse survivors and the general public. Different ways of reaching the public and the media will be discussed.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

Survivorship Ritual Abuse webinars – Journaling: Going Beyond the Book

August 13, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse webinars – Journaling: Going Beyond the Book

Survivorship Ritual Abuse webinars – Journaling: Going Beyond the Book

Upcoming Webinar:

Saturday, August 27, 2011
noon Pacific Time

Flower
“Journaling: Going Beyond the Book”

Do you have a narrow view of journaling? Are you under the impression that there is only “one right way” to do it? Does the thought of journaling bore you to tears? Is it something you feel you need to do, but you have no idea where or how to start? Come to this Webinar and get some ideas for journaling that go beyond the traditional “book” idea.
Abigail, aka Flower, has done different types of journaling over the years and she would love to share with you some of the different things she has tried. Who knows? Perhaps you will find something that appeals to you!

Flower grew up in a generational SRA cult family, but was unaware of that until much later in life. She is a long time member of Survivorship and has done one other Webinar: How a Non-Artist Uses Art for Healing. She has a strong faith in her Creator and has known Yeshua/Jesus since she was a small child, which is reflected in her healing journey and many of her writings. One of her hobbies is taking photos and combining them with encouraging words.

Her love of writing is reflected in poetry, private journaling, and several blogs. One blog focuses specifically on her thoughts as a survivor and in another, she shares a lot of the artwork she has done as part of her healing journey (including the pieces she shared in her Webinar). In a third one, she is starting to put up her poetry. She also juggles being a wife and home educating mom.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes Thursday evening August 25, 2011

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org  and give her this information:

1.Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend: “Journaling: Going Beyond the Book”
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and a guide and instructions after the registration closes

COST
Webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship (Please remember to factor in the cost of the telephone call.)

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

FUTURE WEBINARS
Saturday, September 17
noon Pacific Time
Memory & Survivors
Presenter: Alikina

Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’.  As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works.  We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories.  Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered.

This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past.  She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

Saturday, October 16
10 am Pacific Time (please note change of time)

Neil Brick
“Educating Others about Ritual Abuse”

Neil Brick is a survivor of ritual abuse. He founded S.M.A.R.T.  ( http://ritualabuse.us ) a ritual abuse educational research resource with a ritual abuse newsletter and annual conferences. He is a member of the Survivorship Board of Directors. He is an advocate for getting the truth about ritual abuse out to the general public.

The webinar focus will be on how survivors can safely empower themselves by getting the truth out about the reality of ritual abuse to other child abuse survivors and the general public. Different ways of reaching the public and the media will be discussed.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinars

July 14, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinars

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinars

Upcoming Webinar:

Date: Saturday, July 30, 2011
Time: noon Pacific Time
Presenter: Brianna Pruett
Topic: From Self-Preservation to Self-Celebration – Self Care for Ritual Abuse Survivors.

Brianna Pruett, a survivor of ritual abuse and government-sponsored mind control projects, is a 28-year-old psychology student and musician. She has worked with Randy Noblitt in educating students at Alliant University and maintains a commitment to speaking the truth and empowering other survivors as well as herself. Her website is http://www.briannaleapruett.com.

The webinar focus will be on basic self-care information — such as nutrition, hygiene, and body care — with special tips and thoughts for survivors of ritual abuse, as well as on regaining/reclaiming self-care skills we may have discarded along with the abusive situations.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes Thursday evening July 28, 2011

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org  and give her this information:

1.Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend: From Self-Preservation to Self-Celebration – Self Care for Ritual Abuse Survivors.
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and a guide and instructions after the registration closes

COST
Webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship (Please remember to factor in the cost of the telephone call.)

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

FUTURE WEBINARS
Saturday, August 27th
noon Pacific Time
Journaling: Going Beyond the Book!
Presenter: Flower
Do you have a narrow view of journaling? Are you under the impression that there is only “one right way” to do it? Does the thought of journaling bore you to tears? Is it something you feel you need to do, but you have no idea where or how to start? Come to this Webinar and get some ideas for journaling that go beyond the traditional “book” idea. Abigail, aka Flower, has done different types of journaling over the years and she would love to share with you some of the different things she has tried. Who knows? Perhaps you will find something that appeals to you!

Flower grew up in a generational SRA cult family, but was unaware of that until much later in life. She is a long time member of Survivorship and has done one other Webinar: How a Non-Artist Uses Art for Healing. She has a strong faith in her Creator and has known Yeshua/Jesus since she was a small child…which is reflected in her healing journey and many of her writings. One of her hobbies is taking photos and combining them with encouraging words. Her love of writing is reflected in poetry, private journaling, and several blogs. One blog focuses specifically on her thoughts as a survivor and in another, she shares a lot of the artwork she has done as part of her healing journey (including the pieces she shared in her Webinar). In a third one, she is starting to put up her poetry. She also juggles being a wife and home educating mom.

Saturday, September 17
noon Pacific Time
Memory & Survivors
Presenter: Alikina
Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’.  As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works.  We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories.  Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered.  This  webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past.  She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

 

brain differences in DID/MPD patients, child abuse changes the brain

June 12, 2011 Comments Off on brain differences in DID/MPD patients, child abuse changes the brain

Hippocampal and Amygdalar Volumes in Dissociative Identity Disorder
The neurobiological consequences of early stress and childhood maltreatment
Recent findings regarding brain development and childhood abuse/adversity
Does Child Abuse Permanently Alter the Brain?
The Psychobiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (including physical and sexual abuse)

Hippocampal and Amygdalar Volumes in Dissociative Identity Disorder
Eric Vermetten, M.D., Ph.D., Christian Schmahl, M.D., Sanneke Lindner, M.Sc., Richard J. Loewenstein, M.D., and J. Douglas Bremner, M.D.
Am J Psychiatry 163:630-636, April 2006
doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.163.4.630….

METHOD: The authors used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala in 15 female patients with dissociative identity disorder and 23 female subjects without dissociative identity disorder or any other psychiatric disorder. The volumetric measurements for the two groups were compared.

RESULTS: Hippocampal volume was 19.2% smaller and amygdalar volume was 31.6% smaller in the patients with dissociative identity disorder, compared to the healthy subjects. The ratio of hippocampal volume to amygdalar volume was significantly different between groups.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings are consistent with the presence of smaller hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in patients with dissociative identity disorder, compared with healthy subjects.
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/163/4/630

full text
“The patients with dissociative identity disorder in our study showed a 19.2% smaller hippocampal volume and a 31.6% smaller amygdalar volume, compared with the healthy subjects.”
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/163/4/630

The neurobiological consequences of early stress and childhood maltreatment
Martin H. Teicher, Susan L. Andersena, Ann Polcarib, Carl M. Andersona, Carryl P. Navaltae, and Dennis M. Kima

Abstract
Early severe stress and maltreatment produces a cascade of neurobiological events that have the potential to cause enduring changes in brain development. These changes occur on multiple levels, from neurohumoral (especially the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal {HPA} axis) to structural and functional. The major structural consequences of early stress include reduced size of the mid-portions of the corpus callosum and attenuated development of the left neocortex, hippocampus, and amygdala.

Major functional consequences include increased electrical irritability in limbic structures and reduced functional activity of the cerebellar vermis. There are also gender differences in vulnerability and functional consequences. The neurobiological sequelae of early stress and maltreatment may play a significant role in the emergence of psychiatric disorders during development.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763403000071

Dr. Martin H. Teicher – Recent findings regarding brain development and childhood abuse/adversity
https://drteicher.wordpress.com/

https://drteicher.wordpress.com/2010/11/
Keynote: Pierre Janet memorial lecture ISSTD
Does Child Abuse Permanently Alter the Brain?
Martin H. Teicher, M.D., Ph.D. (PowerPoint)

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
New York Academy of Sciences June 1997
Volume 821 Psychobiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, The Pages xi–xv, 1–548
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nyas.1997.821.issue-1/issuetoc
includes:
Psychobiological Effects of Sexual Abuse : A Longitudinal Study (pages 150–159)
FRANK W. PUTNAM and PENELOPE K. TRICKETT
DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1997.tb48276.x

Preliminary Evidence for Abnormal Cortical Development in Physically and Sexually Abused Children Using EEG Coherence and MRI (pages 160–175)
MARTIN H. TEICHER, YUTAKA ITO, CAROL A. GLOD, SUSAN L. ANDERSEN, NATALIE DUMONT and ERIKA ACKERMAN
DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1997.tb48277.x

Implicit and Explicit Memory for Trauma-Related Information in PTSD (pages 219–224) RICHARD J. MCNALLY
DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1997.tb48281.x

Trauma, Dissociation, and Memory (pages 225–237)
DAVID SPIEGEL DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.1997.tb48282.x

 

Elizabeth Loftus – critiques of her research

April 23, 2011 Comments Off on Elizabeth Loftus – critiques of her research

The accuracy of Elizabeth Loftus’ research and its ethics have been critiqued by several people over the last two decades.  Below is a brief synopsis of some of this research.

“Lost in a Shopping Mall” A Breach of Professional Ethics
Lynn S. Crook  ETHICS & BEHAVIOR, vol. 9, #1, pp. 39-50
The “lost in a shopping mall” study has been cited to support claims that psychotherapists can implant memories of false autobiographical information of childhood trauma in their patients. The mall study originated in 1991 as 5 pilot experiments involving 3 children and 2 adult participants. The University of Washington Human Subjects Committee granted approval for the mall study on August 10, 1992. The preliminary results with the 5 pilot subjects were announced 4 days later. An analysis of the mall study shows that beyond the external misrepresentations, internal scientific methodological errors cast doubt on the validity of the claims that have been attributed to the mall study within scholarly and legal arenas. The minimal involvement or, in some cases, negative impact of collegial consultation, academic supervision, and peer review throughout the evolution of the mall study are reviewed.
http://users.owt.com/crook/memory/

Elizabeth Loftus (from jimhopper.com)
Unfortunately, thus far reporters and journalists have almost completely failed to critically evaluate her claims. Nor have they addressed three crucial facts about her work:

1) Loftus herself conducted and published a study in which nearly one in five women who reported childhood sexual abuse also reported completely forgetting the abuse for some period of time and recovering the memory of it later.
….

3) Loftus is aware that those who study traumatic memory have for several years, based on a great deal of research and clinical experience, used the construct of dissociation to account for the majority of recovered memories. However, she continues to focus on and attack “repression” and “repressed memories,” which has the effect of confusing and misleading many people.
http://www.jimhopper.com/memory/#el

Consider the Evidence for Elizabeth Loftus’
Scholarship and Accuracy. “Remembering Dangerously” & Hoult v. Hoult: The Myth of Repressed Memory that Elizabeth Loftus Created
by Jennifer Hoult, Esq.
http://www.rememberingdangerously.com/

Elizabeth Loftus herself has published studies showing evidence of recovered memory. The 4 January 1996 issue of Accuracy About Abuse notes: Elizabeth Loftus, high profile FMSF advocate, published a paper with colleagues on Remembering and Repressing in 1994. In a study of 105 women outpatients in a substance abuse clinic 54 % reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. 81% remembered all or part of the abuse. 19% reported they forgot the abuse for a period of time and later the memory returned. Women who remembered the abuse their whole lives reported a clearer memory, with a more detailed picture. Women who remembered the abuse their whole lives did not differ from others in terms of the violence of the abuse or whether the violence was incestuous. [Psychology of Women Quarterly, 18 (1994) 67-84.]

Loftus has also discussed “motivated forgetting”, and has presented the documented study of a college professor who became unable to remember a series of traumas, but after some time was able to recover those memories. Loftus remarked “after such an enormously stressful experience, many individuals wish to forget… And often their wish is granted.” (Loftus, 1980/1988, p. 73)” http://web.archive.org/web/20030608221633/http://www.feminista.com/v1n9/false-memory.html

“The hypothesis that false memories can easily be implanted in psychotherapy (Lindsay & Read, 1994; Loftus 1993; Loftus & Ketcham, 1994; Ofshe and Watters, 1993, 1994; Yapko, 1994a) seriously overstates the available data. Since no studies have been conducted on suggested effects in psychotherapy per se, the idea of iatrogenic suggestion of false memories remains an untested hypothesis. (Memory, Trauma Treatment, And the Law Brown, Scheflin and Hammond (D. Corydon) 1998, W. W. Norton 0-393-70254-5)

Memory, Abuse, and Science: Questioning Claims About the False Memory Syndrome Epidemic Pope, K. (1996)
American Psychologist 51: 957. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.51.9.957

Does the trauma specified in the lost-in-the-mall experiment seem comparable to the trauma forming the basis of false memory syndrome? Loftus (1993) described the implanted traumatic event in the shopping-mall experiment as follows: “Chris was convinced by his older brother Jim, that he had been lost in a shopping mall when he was five years old” (p. 532). Does this seem, for example, a reasonable analogy for a five-year-old girl being repeatedly raped by her father? Pezdek (1995; see also Pezdek, Finger, & Hodge, 1996) has suggested that this may not be the case. In attempting to arrive at a more analogous situation-that of a suggested false memory of a rectal enema-her experimental attempts at implantation of a suggestion had a 0% success rate.

What is the impact of the potentially confounding variables in claiming the shopping-mall experiment to be a convincing analogue of therapy (Loftus, 1993; Loftus & Ketcham, 1994)? Is it possible that the findings are an artifact of this particular design, for example, that the older family member claims to have been present when the event occurred and to have witnessed it, a claim the therapist can never make? To date, replications and extensions of this study have tended to use a similar methodology; that is, either the older family member makes the suggestions in his or her role as the experimenter’s confederate, or the experimenter presents the suggestion as being the report of an older family member, thus creating a surrogate confederate.

Has this line of research assumed that verbal reports provided to researchers are the equivalent of actual memories? Spanos (1994) suggested that changes in report in suggestibility research may represent compliance with social demand conditions of the research design rather than actual changes in what is recalled. In what ways were the measures to demonstrate actual changes or creations of memory representations validated and confounding variables (e.g., demand characteristics) excluded? Given that being lost while out shopping is apparently a common childhood experience, how is the determination made that the lost-in-the-mall memory is not substantially correct? What supports the claim that “Chris had remembered a traumatic episode that never occurred” (Garry & Loftus, 1994, p. 83). That is, is there any possibility that Chris’s family had forgotten an actual event of this type?

If the experiment is assumed for heuristic reasons to demonstrate that an older family member can extensively rewrite a younger relative’s memory in regard to a trauma at which the older relative was present, why have false memory syndrome proponents presented this research as applying to the dynamics of therapy (e.g., Loftus, 1993; Loftus & Ketcham, 1994) but not to the dynamics of families, particularly those in which parents or other relatives may be exerting pressure on an adult to retract reports of delayed recall? Is it possible that older family members can rewrite younger relatives’ memories in regard to traumatic events at which they were present? Might this occur in the context of sexual abuse when the repeated suggestion is made by a perpetrator that “nothing happened” and that any subsequent awareness of the abuse constitutes a false memory?
http://www.kspope.com/memory/memory.php

Quotes: Elizabeth Loftus, Ph.D.
http://bit.ly/hxkUbT

A Brief History of the False Memory Research of Elizabeth Loftus
“The lost- in- a-shopping-mall study (Loftus and Pickrell, 1995) provided  initial   scientific support for the claim that child sexual abuse accusations are false memories planted by therapists.  However, the mall study researchers faced a problem early on—the participants could tell the difference between the true and false memories.”  http://bit.ly/dH9uST

The Alleged Ethical Violations of Elizabeth Loftus in the Case of Jane Doe “In conclusion, I believe Loftus made several ethical breaches during her research and when publishing her study. The right to freedom of speech and academic debate does not allow for the kind of ethical breaches that were made. The violating of Jane Doe’s confidentiality without her written consent around such a sensitive issue appears to have been unnecessary and inappropriate.”
http://bit.ly/6bbAW6

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