Recovered Memories of Child Abuse: Accuracy and Veracity, 110 Corroborated Cases of Recovered Memory

November 4, 2014 Comments Off on Recovered Memories of Child Abuse: Accuracy and Veracity, 110 Corroborated Cases of Recovered Memory

110 Corroborated Cases of Recovered Memory:

53 Cases from Legal Proceedings
25 Clinical Cases and other Academic/Scientific Case Studies
33 Other Corroborated Cases of Recovered Memory
http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/case-archive/

Recovered Memories of Sexual Abuse  Scientific Research & Scholarly Resources

Amnesia for childhood sexual abuse is a condition.
The existence of this condition is beyond dispute.
Repression is merely one explanation
– often a confusing and misleading one –
for what causes the condition of amnesia.
Some people sexually abused in childhood
will have periods of amnesia for their abuse,
followed by experiences of delayed recall.
http://www.jimhopper.com/memory/

Research on the Effect of Trauma on Memory
Research has shown that traumatized individuals respond by using a variety of psychological mechanisms. One of the most common means of dealing with the pain is to try and push it out of awareness. Some label the phenomenon of the process whereby the mind avoids conscious acknowledgment of traumatic experiences as dissociative amnesia .  Others use terms such as repression , dissociative state , traumatic amnesia, psychogenic shock, or motivated forgetting .  Semantics aside, there is near-universal scientific acceptance of the fact that the mind is capable of avoiding conscious recall of traumatic experiences.
http://www.leadershipcouncil.org/1/tm/tm.html

What about Recovered Memories?
Jennifer J. Freyd, University of Oregon
http://pages.uoregon.edu/dynamic/jjf/whatabout.html

The Recovered Memory Project
http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory

Research discussing corroboration and accuracy of recovered memories
http://pages.uoregon.edu/dynamic/jjf/suggestedrefs.html

Recovered memory corroboration rates
“Between 31 and 64 percent of abuse survivors in six major studies reported that they forgot “some of the abuse.” Numbers reporting severe amnesia ranged from under 12% to 59%….Studies report 50-75% of abuse survivors corroborating the facts of their abuse through an outside source.”
https://ritualabuse.us/research/memory-fms/recovered-memory-corroboration-rates/

Memory disturbances and dissociative amnesia in Holocaust survivors http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/scholarly-resources/holocaust/
The following articles provide compelling scientific evidence in support of the phenomena of dissociation and recovered memory in Holocaust survivors.

Recovered Memory Data
https://ritualabuse.us/research/memory-fms/recovered-memory-data/

Recovered Memories – Child Abuse Wiki

Recovered memories have been defined as the phenomenon of partially or fully losing parts of memories of traumatic events, and then later recovering part or all of the memories into conscious awareness. They have also been defined as the recollections of memories that are believed to have been unavailable for a certain period of time[1]. There is very strong scientific evidence that recovered memories exist.[2] This has been shown in many scientific studies. The content of recovered memories have fairly high corroboration rates.

Scientific evidence
There are many studies that have proven that the recovered memories of traumatic events exist. Brown, Scheflin and Hammond found 43 studies that showed recovered memories for traumatic events[3]. The Recovered Memory Project has collected 101 corroborated cases of recovered memories[4]. Hopper’s research shows that amnesia for childhood sexual abuse is “beyond dispute.” He states that “at least 10% of people sexually abused in childhood will have periods of complete amnesia for their abuse, followed by experiences of delayed recall” [5] In one study of women with previously documented histories of sexual abuse, 38% of the women did not remember the abuse that had happened 17 years before.[6] Most recovered memories either precede therapy or the use of memory recovery techniques[7]. One studied showed that five out of 19 women with histories of familial sexual abuse either forgot specific details or had “blank periods” for these memories[8]. Another study showed that “40% reported a period of forgetting some or all of the abuse”[9]. Herman and Harvey’s study showed that 16% of abuse survivors had “complete amnesia followed by delayed recall”[10]. Corwin’s individual case study provides evidence of the existence of recovered memories on videotape[11].

Other researchers state:

Research has shown that traumatized individuals respond by using a variety of psychological mechanisms. One of the most common means of dealing with the pain is to try and push it out of awareness. Some label the phenomenon of the process whereby the mind avoids conscious acknowledgment of traumatic experiences as dissociative amnesia. Others use terms such as repression, dissociative state, traumatic amnesia, psychogenic shock, or motivated forgetting. Semantics aside, there is near-universal scientific acceptance of the fact that the mind is capable of avoiding conscious recall of traumatic experiences.[12]

A body of empirical evidence indicates that it is common for abused children to reach adulthood without conscious awareness of the trauma[13]

There is scientific evidence in support of the phenomena of dissociation and recovered memory in Holocaust survivors.[14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36]

Corroboration rates
Many studies show high corroboration rates for recovered memories of traumatic events. These rates vary from 50 – 75%[37], 64%[13], 77%[38], 50%[39], 75%[40] 68%[41] 47%[9], and 70% [42]. One study showed amnesia in 12 murderers, with “objective evidence of severe abuse…obtained in 11 cases”[43]. There are also additional studies showing the corroboration of recovered memories[44][45][46][47].

excerpt used with permission from http://childabusewiki.org/index.php?title=Recovered_Memories

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Disinformation and DID: The Politics of Memory, Top court agrees to hear child p_rnography restitution case

June 29, 2013 Comments Off on Disinformation and DID: The Politics of Memory, Top court agrees to hear child p_rnography restitution case

Disinformation and DID: the Politics of Memory – Brian Moss, MA, MFT
Information on the False Memory Syndrome, Mind Control, Dissociative Identity Disorder, The Media, Ritual Abuse, The Nazis and Programming.
http://ritualabuse.us/research/did/disinformation-and-did-the-politics-of-memory/

Top court agrees to hear child pornography restitution case  
By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON | Thu Jun 27, 2013
(Reuters) – The Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to consider how much victims of child pornography can claim in restitution under a federal law.

The case concerns efforts by a victim, named only as Amy, to seek restitution from Doyle Paroline Of Brownsboro, Texas, who was convicted of possessing child pornography that included two images of Amy.

Amy, now 19, was sexually abused by an uncle when she was 8 and 9 years old. The uncle made images of the abuse that have been widely distributed on the Internet, which is where Paroline acquired them.

The legal question is how much Paroline is required to pay in restitution under the 1994 Mandatory Restitution for Sexual Exploitation of Children Act. Amy said Paroline is liable for the full amount of her injury – such as counseling and loss of future income – while Paroline said he should only be liable for his individual role. Amy has claimed $3.4 million.

A federal court initially denied Amy any restitution in Paroline’s case but an appeals court said restitution of the full amount of the loss is required. Paroline asked the Supreme Court to review that finding. Amy’s case is one of several similar cases around the country.

Court papers said more than 150 courts have awarded Amy restitution but Paroline’s is the only one before the Supreme Court….

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/27/us-usa-court-restitution-idUSBRE95Q0W520130627

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Landmark Children’s Rights Case
By James R. Marsh on June 27, 2013

Earlier today, the United States Supreme Court agreed to review a case brought by the Marsh Law Firm concerning criminal restitution for victims of child pornography.

The Court agreed to decide “what, if any, causal relationship or nexus between the defendant’s conduct and the victim’s harm or damages must the government or the victim establish in order to recover restitution under 18 U.S.C. §2259,” the Mandatory Restitution for Sexual Exploitation of Children Act of 1994.

The case, Doyle Randall Paroline v. Amy Unknown, arises out of a long-fought and extensively litigated criminal restitution action which began almost four years ago before Judge Leonard Davis in the Eastern District of Texas Tyler Division.
http://www.childlaw.us/2013/06/supreme-court-agrees-to-hear-l.html

CKLN-FM Mind Control Series, How our brains work to erase bad memories

October 23, 2012 Comments Off on CKLN-FM Mind Control Series, How our brains work to erase bad memories

CKLN-FM Mind Control Series – Table of Contents 
includes:
– Mind Control Survivors’ Testimony at the Human Radiation Experiments Hearings
– Interview with Valerie Wolf, Claudia Mullen and Chris deNicola Ebner
– Lecture by Dr. Alan Scheflin – History of Mind Control
– Claudia Mullen – Presentation to the Believe the Children Conference, Interview
– Lecture by Therapist Valerie Wolf, M.S.W.: Assessment and Treatment of Survivors of Sadistic Abuse
– Interview with Valerie Wolf, M.S.W., therapist to trauma and mind control survivors
– Interview with Dr. Stephen Kent, sociologist at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, on Cults and Ritual Abuse
– Making up for Lost Time Conference, Thunder Bay – Lynne Moss-Sharman Interview – ACHES-MC contact, ritual abuse victim
– Presentation by Professor Alan Scheflin – Risk Management in Dissociative Disorder and Trauma Therapy
– Ritual Abuse Panel — Toronto psychotherapist Gail Fisher-Taylor and Caryn Stardancer, California-based advocate for survivors and publisher of “Survivorship”.
http://www.randomcollection.info/mcf/radio/ckln-hm.htm

How our brains work to erase bad memories – Got a bad memory? The brain has a unique way of helping you forget. By Meghan Holohan  October 19, 2012

….Researchers found that we use two different ways — suppression or substitution — to avoid thinking of uncomfortable or unhappy memories.

“We assume that, in everyday life, healthy people will use a mixture of both mechanisms to prevent an unwanted memory from coming to mind,” says Roland Benoit, a scientist at the Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at University of Cambridge, via email. “We did not know whether the processes of direct suppression and thought substitution can be isolated, and which, if any of them, would actually cause forgetting.”

Roland and his co-author, Michael Anderson, asked 36 adults to participate in a memory exercise where half suppressed memories and the other half substituted new memories. The researchers hoped to understand how we voluntarily forget and how it affects general memory. The subjects were tested during magnetic resonance imaging procedures, or MRIs, allowing the researchers to observe how the brain works during suppression and substitution.

While both processes cause forgetting, a different region of the brain controls each one. When people suppress memories, the dorsal prefrontal cortex inhibits activation in the hippocampus, which plays an important role in retaining memories.

“It thus effectively breaks the remembering process. This, in turn, disrupts the memory representations that would be necessary for recalling the unwanted memory later on,” Benoit explains….

“By just looking at how well people forgot memories, you couldn’t tell whether they had done direct suppression or thought substitution,” Benoit says. “These mechanisms are based on different brain systems that work in opposite fashion: One (direct suppression) by ‘slamming the mental break’ to stop the remembering process and the other (thought substitution) by steering the remembering process towards a substitute memory.”

Even though people exploit both to forget those nagging, unwanted memories, actively overlooking unpleasant events can negatively impact how we remember. But Benoit notes that learning how people deal with unwanted memories helps them understand how people with traumatic memories, such as PTSD sufferers, cope with remembering.

“It is perfectly natural for people, upon encountering an unwelcome reminder, to try to put the unpleasant reminding out of mind. We all have experienced this.  Intuitively, it feels as though we solved this problem.”
http://bodyodd.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/10/19/14540990-how-our-brains-work-to-erase-bad-memories

Lawyer doesn’t remember stealing paintings – Dissociative Amnesia

August 18, 2012 Comments Off on Lawyer doesn’t remember stealing paintings – Dissociative Amnesia

Lawyer doesn’t remember stealing paintings Thu Aug 16, 2012

Michael Gerard Sullivan, 54, has pleaded guilty to stealing two paintings from the Katoomba Fine Art Gallery in December 2008….CCTV vision clearly shows Mr Sullivan stealing two James Willebrant paintings between courses.

During his court case Mr Sullivan’s lawyers tendered two psychiatric reports which concluded he had dissociative amnesia and his actions were totally out of character.

The court heard the disorder caused him to take on the identity of an art thief and not remember his actions

Judge Jennifer English accepted the diagnosis, saying Mr Sullivan had previously lived an exemplary life.

She did not record a conviction.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-08-16/lawyer-does-not-remember-stealing-paintings/4202708

The Lawyer Who Forgot He Was a Thief
August 16, 2012 By Joe Palazzolo

Michael Gerard Sullivan, a lawyer in Sydney, Australia, was dining one night in 2008 at an art gallery restaurant when, according to the security cameras that recorded him, he excused himself between courses and stole two paintings worth $14,500.

Mr. Sullivan, who previously worked at some of the country’s top firms – including Freehills, Gadens and Mallesons (now King & Wood Mallesons after a big merger earlier this year) – pleaded guilty, with one caveat: He said he didn’t remember committing the crime….

The psychiatrists said Mr. Sullivan, who faced up to seven years in jail, was playing the character of an art thief. Australia’s ABC News reported Thursday that Judge English accepted Mr. Sullivan’s defense.

Judge English dismissed the charges but placed Mr. Sullivan on a two-year good behavior bond, saying he had lived an otherwise exemplary life, according to the ABC report.

The Cleveland Clinic, by the way, describes dissociative amnesia thus:

Dissociative amnesia occurs when a person blocks out certain information, usually associated with a stressful or traumatic event, leaving him or her unable to remember important personal information. With this disorder, the degree of memory loss goes beyond normal forgetfulness and includes gaps in memory for long periods of time or of memories involving the traumatic event.
http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2012/08/16/the-lawyer-who-forgot-he-was-a-thief/

Dissociative Amnesia
http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/dissociative_disorders/hic_dissociative_amnesia.aspx

Survivorship Webinar (for survivors and professionals): Saturday, December 17, 2011

December 1, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Webinar (for survivors and professionals): Saturday, December 17, 2011

Survivorship Webinar (for survivors and professionals): Saturday, December 17,  2011

Upcoming Webinar (for survivors and professionals):
Saturday, December 17, 2011
noon Pacific Time (2 hours)
Memory & Survivors

Presenter: Alikina
Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’  As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works.  We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories.  Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered.  This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past.  She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes the Thursday evening before the webinar

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org   and give her this information:

1. Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and an invitation link and instructions after the registration closes

COST
Professional Webinars are $50 and include CEUs upon request.
All other webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship.
(While we offer full scholarships for webinars, it would be great if you would be willing to pay anything, even $5 rather than expect a full scholarship. While we understand that money can be difficult to find, please try to pay what you can to help cover the cost of the webinar provider).

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars (not professional) in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html 

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Professional Webinars

November 27, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse Professional Webinars

Survivorship is pleased to announce a new webinar series, in 2 parts, for professionals, for which you can request CEUs. (through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences which covers Marriage and Family Therapists (MFT); Licensed Clinical Social Workers (LCSW); Licensed Educational Psychologists (LEP); Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (LPCC); MFT Interns (IMF); Associate Clinical Social Workers (ASW); and Professional Clinical Counselor Interns (PCCI) in the State of California).

The dates are January 28th and March 31st, 2012
from noon to 3:00 PM pacific time.

All  speakers in our professional series  are trained professionals in the field with many years of experience both in the practical aspect of working with survivors of Ritual Abuse and Mind Control as well as having been speakers at professional conferences in the past.

Upcoming Professional Webinar:

Saturday, January 28 and March 31, 2012
noon Pacific Time (3 hours)
Sexual Ethics 101 + 102

(You can register for one or both. One is not exclusive of the other)

Presenter:
Staci Sprout, LICSW, CSAT, has 16 years of post-graduate experience as a psychotherapist and social worker in clinical practice, community mental health, hospitals, nursing homes, and public health.  For the last five years her practice has focused almost exclusively as an individual, group and couples therapist working with adults in recovery from sexual and related addictions.  She completed the HARE Psychopathy training in 2008 and has conducted forensic evaluations for adults accused of sexual crimes.  As a therapy client and addict herself with over 20 years of successful personal recovery, Staci brings a compassionate and direct approach to the complex topic of sexual ethics.

Sexual Ethics Series

This 2 part series is designed to raise awareness about key ethical sexual issues facing helping professionals today.  I offer practical tools to enhance your treatment of sexual issues, an ethical decision-making model, guidance on when to refer, consideration of ethnic and cultural issues, information about less obvious yet important sexual boundary issues in the helping relationship, and a case study presentation of sexual challenges in a clinical setting transforming and resolving over time.  Please note:  Sexual Ethics 102 builds on the information shared in Sexual Ethics 101, but can be taken without having already completed this class.

Sexual Ethics 101

CLIENT EMPOWERMENT:  Learn a practical, dynamic tool that includes a vision of sexual health to assists clients in discerning their sexual behavior and values, and then explore them more deeply over time.  This tool is called “The Four Pillars of Sexual Integrity”

ETHICAL CHOICES:  Learn a working model of ethical decision-making called “The Five Stars of Ethical Excellence” to assist in deliberation of even the most challenging ethical dilemmas

SCOPE OF PRACTICE ISSUES:  Receive clear guidance on when to refer to sexual specialists, including Certified Sex Therapists (CST), LGBTQ Specialists, and Certified Sexual Addictions Therapists (CSAT), and/or Sex Offender Treatment Providers (SOTP).

ETHICAL STATEMENT:  Receive a sample personal ethics statement, as a starting point for your practice or organization, that addresses sexual issues

Sexual Ethics 102:

CROSS ETHNIC/CROSS CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS:  As related to perspectives on love and sexual health

TALKING IN DETAILS:  Participate in an experiential exercise to further discern your own sexual values, sexual self-care, and support

SEXUAL BOUNDARIES FOR HELPING PROFESSIONALS:  How to maintain, what to say, related to keeping the relationship safe and non-sexual

TRAUMATIC REENACTMENTS:  Holding curiosity about what emerges over time with  sexual challenges in a safe therapy setting a case study

Upcoming Webinar (for survivors and professionals):
Saturday, December 17, 2011
noon Pacific Time (2 hours)
Memory & Survivors

Presenter: Alikina
Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’  As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works.  We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories.  Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered.  This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling.  She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past.  She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes the Thursday evening before the webinar

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org   and give her this information:

1. Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and an invitation link and instructions after the registration closes

COST

Professional Webinars are $50 and include CEUs upon request.
All other webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship.
(While we offer full scholarships for webinars, it would be great if you would be willing to pay anything, even $5 rather than expect a full scholarship. While we understand that money can be difficult to find, please try to pay what you can to help cover the cost of the webinar provider).

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

PAST WEBINARS

Survivorship members may listen to past webinars (not professional) in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing

November 10, 2011 Comments Off on Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing

Survivorship Ritual Abuse Webinar – Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing

REMINDER:
Upcoming Webinars:

Saturday, November 19
12 PM Pacific Time
deJoly LaBrier
“All Together Now, a Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing”

deJoly LaBrier was born into a Marine Corps family that was involved in a child sex ring, government experimentation and a sadistic ritualistic cult. In 1988, deJoly began the healing journey toward wholeness while identifying 52+ alter personalities that carried on her life. She is the author of two books, DIARY OF A SURVIVOR IN ART AND POETRY, and ALL TOGETHER NOW, A MULTIPLE’S STORY OF HOPE & HEALING. Today she lives with her partner in the mountains of Northwest Georgia, enjoying the serenity and beauty of nature.

deJoly LaBrier will talk about the methods she used to heal from the effects of ritualized torture, an organized child sex ring, and government experimentation. In her recent book, ALL TOGETHER NOW, A MULTIPLE’S STORY OF HOPE AND HEALING, deJoly writes in detail about the various forms the abuse took. She is grateful that during the early part of her recovery, she was introduced to the 12-Steps of AA, as they have been adapted into other groups.

REGISTRATION
Registration closes Thursday evening November 17, 2011

To reserve a space in the webinar, e-mail Shamai at shamai@survivorship.org   and give her this information:

1. Your name
2. The webinar you wish to attend: “All Together Now, a Multiple’s Story of Hope & Healing”
3. Amount and method of payment  (check, PayPal, money order)
4. Your preferred e-mail address (so we can send you instructions)
5. The name you will be using for the webinar. (This does not have to be your real name or your message board screen name.)

You will receive a confirmation email immediately and a guide and instructions after the registration closes

COST

Webinars are on a sliding scale from $50.00 to full scholarship (Please remember to factor in the cost of the telephone call if you don’t have a computer headset).

The PayPal button is near the bottom of the page at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you wish to pay by check please send it to: Survivorship, Family Justice Center, 470 27th Street, Oakland, CA 94612.

UPCOMING WEBINAR

Saturday, December 17
12 pm Pacific Time
Alikina
“Memory & Survivors”

Most survivors have questions about their memory processes at some time: ‘is it true, did it happen?’ or ‘why can’t I remember?’, or even ‘why do I keep having intrusive memories?’. As we heal, we also become aware of times when our memories seem different than how we’ve been lead to believe ‘normal’ memory works. We feel like we forget too much, or we have nearly perfect memories. Often questions about memories of abuse are addressed in therapy, groups, books, etc; but questions about the everyday workings of memory, and how abuse may be affecting our brain function, stay unanswered. This webinar will primarily focus on what current psychological science knows about basic memory processes, as well as issues unique to the survivor community, learning styles and how they affect memory, tricks to assist remembering, and plenty of Q & A time.

Alikina is a survivor of severe abuse and a current grad-school student halfway through her Master’s Degree in Mental Health Counseling. She has presented articles and webinars for Survivorship in the past. She has worked with abuse survivors through community support organizations and been in therapy as both the client and the therapist, and plans to work with abuse and trauma survivors as her career path.

PAST WEBINARS
Survivorship members may listen to past webinars in the members’ section.
For information on joining Survivorship, go to http://www.survivorship.org/about/membership.html

Complete details on all our webinars are at http://www.survivorship.org/webinars.html

If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact Shamai@survivorship.org

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