Analysing Aaronovitch: has the scourge of ‘conspiracists’ become one himself?, The Rochdale and Nottingham cases have revealed widespread sexual abuse of children based on satanic practices. Yet the children are still not believed.

June 18, 2015 Comments Off on Analysing Aaronovitch: has the scourge of ‘conspiracists’ become one himself?, The Rochdale and Nottingham cases have revealed widespread sexual abuse of children based on satanic practices. Yet the children are still not believed.

– Seen But Not Heard
The Rochdale and Nottingham cases have revealed widespread sexual abuse of children based on satanic practices.  Yet the children are still not believed.

– Analysing Aaronovitch: has the scourge of ‘conspiracists’ become one himself?
“There was indeed a cultural revolution during the 1980s: it was not triggered by trans-Atlantic folly but the bodies of children. For a dozen years, Britain had been scalded by about 30 deaths of children due to abuse, and by the evidence of official inquiries. Unnoticed in life, in death they became household names. The pivotal cases for social work in the 1980s were Tyra Henry, Kimberley Carlisle and Jasmine Beckford. These children’s fate alerted health and welfare professionals to what became known as ‘child abuse’. ”

“The mid-80s, then, was the time when British institutions were forced to pay attention to the oppression of children in a new way.  Priests and pagans, teachers, pop stars politicians and parents were sexually abusing children then as now, and weren’t properly investigated.”

– Analysing Aaronovitch: a sceptical narrative
“I made a documentary about the Nottingham case in 1990. This is the Nottingham timeline: in 1987 children were received into care from an extended family with a long history of inter-generational sexual abuse, including criminal convictions.”

Analysing Aaronovitch: a sceptical narrative
Beatrix Campbell 17 June 2015

Prosecution and conviction rates for sexual crime are lamentably low in the UK. If David Aaronovitch cares about ‘genuine abuse’, why isn’t this what worries him more? Part Two.

The first tests of the new era were in the northern county of Cleveland, (my book on this case, Unofficial Secrets, is being updated for electronic publication this year), and in Nottingham.  They combusted over medical signs in Cleveland, and children’s stories of abuse in Nottingham. Actually, these crises were triggered by police resistance to the medical signs and stories, and their reluctance to investigate them….

I made a documentary about the Nottingham case in 1990. This is the Nottingham timeline: in 1987 children were received into care from an extended family with a long history of inter-generational sexual abuse, including criminal convictions. Once safe, these children began talking to their new foster carers about their lives, their parents’ sexual abuse, witch parties and their worries about other children. Their evidence, and the testimony of foster parents and social workers was heard in wardship court proceedings in 1988.

Mrs Justice Booth, in her judgement, described the culture of the abuse as ‘satanic’ – her word. In July 1988 three Appeal Court judges endorsed that conclusion and Sir Stephen Brown, in an unusual public judgement, reported in the press on 19 July 1988, said that children ‘had been subjected to gross sexual abuse at the hands of adults, sometimes at parties, where full intercourse had taken place in the presence of a number of adults and other children’….

In 1989 ten adults were convicted on the basis of evidence that children were being ‘sadistically abused and tortured and being forced to watch other children suffering in a similar way.’ They were forced to eat excrement and drink urine, watch other children forced into sexual intercourse ‘over a prolonged period and in an organised manner’. These words are taken from the Director of Social Services report on the case – and the controversy – to Nottinghamshire County Council  on 7 November 1990.

It wasn’t social workers or foster carers who decided that there was ‘satanic’ abuse, it was the judges in 1988….

The Director’s report followed my Channel 4 Dispatches documentary on the Nottingham case in October 1990; it scrutinised the JET report and interviewed the academic John Newson who gave JET its line on fantasy, confabulation, and staff brainwashing children. However, when I asked whether he had actually talked to the foster carers or social workers, he admitted that he had not. Unlike Aaronovitch, Waterhouse or Nathan, my documentary interviewed social workers, and foster carers. I also interviewed adults in the family who had been convicted and who corroborated the children’s evidence.

The 7 November 1990  report by the Director of Social Services was the last official word: it rejected the JET report and explained the social workers view of the abuse the children had endured: ’we cannot say’ whether ritual events were ‘true’ or whether children ‘were deliberately misled into believing they had happened’. The Director agreed with the workers directly involved  that ‘the significance of ritual overtones is not necessarily linked to a belief system but that it provided a mechanism for manipulating vulnerable children.’ His report accepted the social workers’ definition of ritual abuse as activities and symbols ‘used to frighten, intimidate and confuse the children.’….

There are corroborated cases. More recently clinicians, most famously Bessel van der Kolk in the US, have studied the neurology of trauma and amnesia among survivors of sexual abuse. The eminent Harvard therapist Judith Lewis Herman writes, ‘On the one hand, traumatised people remember too much; on the other hand, they remember too little.’  For Herman, ‘The conflict between knowing and not knowing, speech and silence, remembering and forgetting, is the central dialectic of psychological trauma’….
https://www.opendemocracy.net/5050/beatrix-campbell/analysing-aaronovitch

Analysing Aaronovitch: has the scourge of ‘conspiracists’ become one himself?
Beatrix Campbell 17 June 2015

David Aaronovitch claims ‘unbelievable’ notions about child abuse that ‘bewitched’ professionals decades ago are echoed in the VIP historic abuse cases. Where is his evidence? Part One.

….So let’s consider his argument:

Ritual abuse

At the end of the 1980s ‘unbelievable’ theories that had been accorded respectability within professional and clinical circles wafted across the Atlantic, ‘the occult flame was kept alight beyond the shores of America,’ he told listeners; then professionals (doing what they do) read books and went to conferences. Ideas were planted in ‘surprisingly fertile soil,’ in that ‘hothouse for new intellectual plants’ none other than ‘the professional conference.’

They were possessed. They saw the movie Sybil, they read ‘Michelle Remembers’. Who knows, like millions of others, they might have seen Rosemary’s Baby or The Exorcist.

We don’t know which, if any professionals were possessed by these texts: Nor does Aaronovitch. But that doesn’t matter. I know many practitioners, from police officers to foster carers, doctors and social workers  involved in many of the celebrated and contested child abuse cases of the past quarter century, including those singled out by Aaronovitch, and I’m not aware that any had any of this stuff in their heads. I’ve consulted other journalists, and they’re not either.

Isn’t reading books and going to conferences part of what professionals and experts do? Learn? Share ideas? Aaronovitch traduces normal and necessary activities as sinister. One of Aaronovitch’s witnesses, the journalist Rosie Waterhouse, mapped ‘the progress of an idea’: UK and US professionals, especially Californians, were  crossing the Atlantic and conferring; her nugget: ’the conference circuit.’

After a conference at Reading in 1989, she said, the witch hunt broke out in Britain. Waterhouse is wrong.

There was indeed a cultural revolution during the 1980s: it was not triggered by trans-Atlantic folly but the bodies of children. For a dozen years, Britain had been scalded by about 30 deaths of children due to abuse, and by the evidence of official inquiries. Unnoticed in life, in death they became household names. The pivotal cases for social work in the 1980s were Tyra Henry, Kimberley Carlisle and Jasmine Beckford. These children’s fate alerted health and welfare professionals to what became known as ‘child abuse’.  There was public and professional outrage, workers were castigated for a perceived failure to intervene and – most specifically with Jasmine Beckford in 1985 – to heed the child and what she might have to say about her family life. In the mid-80s sexual abuse emerged as a category of concern.

In the second half of the decade, local authority staff had an unequivocal statutory duty  to investigate when they had ‘reasonable suspicion’ that a child was being abused. The law states – then and now – not that they ‘may’ but that they ‘shall’ intervene. It was and is their statutory duty.

That, not Californian phantoms, was the context in which professionals were mandated to act….

The mid-80s, then, was the time when British institutions were forced to pay attention to the oppression of children in a new way.  Priests and pagans, teachers, pop stars politicians and parents were sexually abusing children then as now, and weren’t properly investigated.

However, what provoked controversy and crisis then was not only what we were learning about childhood adversity, but whether the professions, particularly the police, and our political culture could stand it, respond appropriately, and withstand the inevitable reaction.

There was no great wave of state piracy, social workers kidnapping kids; and despite the new knowledge and the legal duties of professionals, there was resistance to evidence that became entrenched. The implications were woeful. According to Susan Creighton, an expert on recorded abuse, statistics on the numbers of children registered as being at risk of harm (including sexual abuse) rose most significantly between 1985 and 1986, reaching a peak of 0.65 children per 1000 in 1987, and declining thereafter.

Though changes in registration criteria after 1990 make direct comparisons difficult, sexual abuse registrations fell dramatically up to 2002, and settled at a relatively low level between 2002 and 2014. There was no panic or hysteria, no wave of children being removed either rightly or wrongly from their parents.
https://opendemocracy.net/5050/beatrix-campbell/analysing-aaronovitch-has-scourge-of-%E2%80%98conspiracists%E2%80%99-become-one-himself

Seen But Not Heard
The Rochdale and Nottingham cases have revealed widespread sexual abuse of children based on satanic practices.  Yet the children are still not believed. Beatrix Campbell, presenter of  the recent Dispatches programme on the Nottingham case, explains why
http://www.amielandmelburn.org.uk/collections/mt/pdf/90_11_20.pdf

30% rise in first-time callers to Rape Crisis Centre
Wednesday 17 June 2015

There was a 30% increase in the number of first time callers to the Rape Crisis Centre’s National 24-Hour Helpline last year.

The Centre’s annual report for 2014 also shows an increase of 14% in calls relating to adult rape.

Almost half of all calls related to childhood sexual abuse, including ritual abuse and suspected abuse….
http://www.rte.ie/news/2015/0617/708675-rape-crisis-centre/

‘Witchhunt Narrative Retells ’80s Day Care Abuse, 299,933 indecent images with 478 of the worst kind in category five, including ritual and satanic abuse, Second UN panel criticizes Vatican on sex abuse, more than three million reports of child abuse

May 26, 2014 Comments Off on ‘Witchhunt Narrative Retells ’80s Day Care Abuse, 299,933 indecent images with 478 of the worst kind in category five, including ritual and satanic abuse, Second UN panel criticizes Vatican on sex abuse, more than three million reports of child abuse

– ‘Witchhunt Narrative’ Retells ’80s Day Care Abuse
” an awful lot of abused children deserve an apology”

– Former company director from Dewsbury had more than 300,000 indecent images of children
“Analysis revealed he had 299,933 indecent images with 478 of the worst kind in category five, including ritual and satanic abuse.”

– Second UN panel criticizes Vatican on sex abuse

– Child abuse numbers aren’t pretty
“more than three million reports of child abuse are made in the United States each year and the U.S. has one of the worst records in the world”

‘Witchhunt Narrative’ Retells ’80s Day Care Abuse
By Wendy Murphy
WeNews contributing editor
Friday, May 23, 2014

For readers who learned about these cases from conventional media, this book will be a shocking revelation of how reporters skewed criminal cases to the disadvantage of victims. Now it seems an awful lot of abused children deserve an apology.

(WOMENSENEWS)–In his explosive new book, “The Witchhunt Narrative,” Brown University Professor Ross Cheit challenges everything you think you know about the “day care center” hysteria of the 1980s.

The infamous California McMartin case, for example, was widely perceived as a terrible injustice where innocent adults were persecuted based on statements from hysterical parents, bad cops, fascist prosecutors and incompetent children. But as it turns out in this book, it wasn’t such an injustice after all.

Several of the teachers charged were innocent, but the underlying claims about many children being sexually abused by Ray Buckey (aided by his mother) were quite credible….

Cheit, a lawyer with a doctorate in public policy, meticulously documents the evidence from many of the high-profile cases and proves time and time again that nearly all the day care center cases were based on credible and compelling evidence. The children in many of the stories he discusses made statements independent from one another, free from the influence of parents, police or anyone else. Contrary to the theme of much media coverage, there was no reason to suspect the children were being made to lie by vindictive parents….
http://www.womensenews.org/story/books/140521/witchhunt-narrative-retells-80s-day-care-abuse

Former company director from Dewsbury had more than 300,000 indecent images of children May 24, 2014

A former company director from Dewsbury has been exposed as a child porn pervert collecting more than 300,000 of the worst images of girls on his computer.

Stephen Kay, 58, downloaded and distributed child porn from the internet to fuel his unnatural lust. He did it behind the backs of his wife and daughter while working for the IPS Group as a project engineer.

Kay was made redundant from his job and asked to leave the family home after a police raid seized his computers, USB sticks and a hard drive from his home in Carlton Road.

Analysis revealed he had 299,933 indecent images with 478 of the worst kind in category five, including ritual and satanic abuse. In addition he had 7,795 images of category seven of extreme pornography.

Kay appeared at Hull Crown Court for sentence on Monday after pleading guilty to six charges of possession of indecent images of children and one charge of distributing images….

Kay was given a two-year suspended prison sentence, given a Sexual Offences Prevention order and must undergo a sex offenders treatment programme. He was also banned from working with children and must sign on the National Sex Offenders’ Register for 10 years.
http://www.batleynews.co.uk/news/local/former-company-director-from-dewsbury-had-more-than-300-000-indecent-images-of-children-1-6636008

Second UN panel criticizes Vatican on sex abuse
By John L. Allen Jr. Globe Staff   May 23, 2014
ROME — For the second time, a United Nations panel has criticized the Vatican for its response to the child sexual abuse scandals in the Catholic Church, charging it with failing to mandate that abuse charges be reported to police, moving clergy to evade discipline, and failing to see that victims obtain adequate compensation.

“Clergy . . . were transferred to other dioceses and institutions where they remained in contact with minors and others who are vulnerable,” the United Nations Committee against Torture charged in a new report, “and in some cases committed abuse in their subsequent placements.”

The report follows a similar indictment from the Committee on the Rights of the Child that appeared in February, which asserted that the Vatican had fostered “impunity” for abusers….

Unlike the earlier UN assessment, the new report mixes criticism with praise for steps taken by the Catholic Church over the last decade to combat child abuse, including tougher legal sanctions for clergy and the creation of a new papal commission in December 2013 to press for reform. That commission includes Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley of Boston…..

At the same time, the committee suggested that pledges of zero tolerance by church officials aren’t always effectively translated into action….

In its report, the panel said it was “concerned by reports’’ that Catholic officials “resist the principle of mandatory reporting’’ of abuse allegations….
http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/05/22/second-panel-criticzes-vatican-sex-abuse/YuX300eGKJYDNUPVdTXcmJ/story.html

Child abuse numbers aren’t pretty
By Patsy Kelly Friday, May 23, 2014
TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) – Local children are suffering every day. It’s a hidden epidemic of child abuse and neglect.

Nationally, more than three million reports of child abuse are made in the United States each year and the U.S. has one of the worst records in the world.

More than four children die every day as a result of child abuse. And it can have long-term effects throughout the next generations….
http://wthitv.com/2014/05/23/child-abuse-numbers-arent-pretty/

 

What hysteria?, Cult and Ritual abuse reviews

May 6, 2009 § Leave a comment

from http://ritualabuse.us

What hysteria? A systematic study of newspaper coverage of accused child molesters – Ross E. Cheit – Child Abuse & Neglect 27 (2003) 607-623 Results: Most defendants (56.1%) were not mentioned in the newspaper. Factors associated with a greater chance of coverage include: cases involving first-degree charges, cases with multiple counts,cases involving additional violence or multiple victims, and cases resulting in long prison sentences. The data indicate that the press exaggerates “stranger danger,” while intra-familial cases are underreported. Newspaper accounts also minimize the extent to which guilty defendants avoid prison. Conclusions: Generalizing about the nature of child molestation cases in criminal court on the basis of newspaper coverage is inappropriate. The coverage is less extensive than often claimed, and it is skewed in ways that are typical of the mass media….Conclusions – The findings in this study dispute many popular claims about “media hysteria” over child sexual abuse. Based on a comprehensive analysis of all those charged with this crime in Rhode Island in 1 year, it is clear that the coverage was generally limited and often nonexistent. More than half the people charged with child molestation never had their name in the newspaper. Only a handful of those covered received anything more than a few stories, and much of that in brief “fillers” (under 200 words). The lack of support for the “hysteria” position is all the more significant because most of the coverage in this study was in 1993. That is the year that Jenkins (1996) called “the peak of media concern” about pedophile priests. Newsweek had a cover story in 1993 about the so-called “hysteria” about child sexual abuse (Shapiro, 1993). This study suggests that the hysteria narrative does not have comprehensive empirical support in the real world. Like an urban legend, this narrative is continually told and accepted without appropriate skepticism.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V7N-48NC1DN-8&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=65202c87aab1224ac207d3df874938d1


Cult and ritual abuse: Its history, anthropology, and recent discovery in contemporary America
, (rev.ed.). Noblitt, James Randall; Perskin, Pamela Sue  Westport, CT, US: Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group. (2000). xvii, 269 pp. Abstract A personal but also scholarly journey into the clandestine and confusing world of ritual abuse, this book provides unique insights into the catastrophic experiences of ritual abuse survivors and their efforts to find healing through psychological treatment. This revised edition provides contemporary revelations about cults in existence today and also new therapies developed since the first edition was published in 1995. The special legal dilemmas, survival problems and day-to-day life experiences of these survivors are examined in a scholarly but sensitive manner. The book presents the idea that ritual abuse is an age-old phenomenon found in many cultures throughout the world. That ritual abuse causes a variety of specific psychiatric symptoms is noted. Special attention is given to the diagnosis dissociative identity disorder that is frequently found among ritual abuse survivors. Suggestions are offered for effectively dealing with the various social and legal problems that result from this severe form of abuse. New diagnoses–cult and ritual trauma disorder–are proposed for this newly identified problem. http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.displayRecord&uid=2000-05295-000

Cult and Ritual Abuse: Sadism Not Sophism A review of Cult and Ritual Abuse: Its History, Anthropology, and Recent Discovery in Contemporary America (Rev. ed.) by James Randall Noblitt and Pamela Sue Perskin Westport, CT: Praeger/Greenwood, 2000. 269 pp. ISBN 0-275-96665-8. $24.95 paperback Reviewed by John Schmuttermaier The authors provide a comprehensive and well-documented account of the two forms of ritualized abused: ritual abuse and satanic ritual abuse…. At first, Noblitt was incredulous and did not take his patients seriously. What finally convinced him were the “comparable reports from other patients” (p. xiv) who were exhibiting the “same cluster of psychiatric symptoms” (p. xiv). Discussions with his colleagues revealed that they also had patients reporting similar stories of abuse (p. xiv). Collectively, these factors changed his mind…. The second theme concerns an attempt to validate the existence of ritualized abuse rather than simply satanic ritual abuse. To do this, the authors provide empirical evidence and explanation (Chapters 6-13). The evidence and explanation takes the form of a comprehensive review of the literature that supports the existence of ritual abuse….  This book provides the reader with a rigorous and interesting account of a contentious issue. http://psycnet.apa.org/critiques/46/6/615.html

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