Fascism spread in 1930s America. It could spread again today. Fred Trump and the KKK

August 17, 2017 Comments Off on Fascism spread in 1930s America. It could spread again today. Fred Trump and the KKK

Charles Lindbergh went so far as to praise Adolf Hitler as “undoubtedly a great man.”

As late as July 1942, a Gallup poll showed that 1 in 6 Americans thought Hitler was “doing the right thing” to the Jews.

The careers of anti-Semitic celebrities such as Catholic Rev. Charles Coughlin reflected the popular appeal of fascist ideas….enjoyed the second-largest radio audience in the country frequently quoted Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, and praised the Nazi quest for racial purity.

Newspaper clips obtained by VICE suggest the Republican frontrunner’s father (Fred Trump) may have worn the robe and hood of a Klansman in 1927.


Fascism spread in 1930s America. It could spread again today.
By  Seva Gunitsky Special to the Washington Post  August 16, 2017

The violent white nationalist rally in Virginia has reawakened simmering fears of American fascism. But the roots of these feelings — and the militant organizations that promoted them — did not begin with the election of President Donald Trump. The last time fascism was brazenly embraced was in the 1930s. The lessons of that crucial decade bear increasing relevance for modern American life. The three big factors that drove the spread of American fascism at that time are still relevant for America today.

Fascist ideas were quite popular in 1930s America

In the 1930s, fascist ideas were increasingly accepted. This was reflected in the energetic growth of Nazi organizations. Ku Klux Klan rallies were common and numerous; Trump’s own father was reportedly arrested at one such rally. A 1941 book found that more than 100 such organizations had formed since 1933.

The appeal of fascist ideas extended far beyond the fringe, reaching prominent citizens such as Henry Ford and Charles Lindbergh. Lindbergh went so far as to praise Adolf Hitler as “undoubtedly a great man.” In 1940, Lindbergh’s wife published a bestseller that called totalitarianism “The Wave of the Future” and an “ultimately good conception of humanity.”….

At the time, Jews served the same role for U.S. fascists that immigrants, Muslims and other minorities serve today: a vague but malicious threat they believed to be undermining America’s greatness. Surveys of U.S. public opinion from the 1930s are a startling reminder of just how widespread these attitudes became. As late as July 1942, a Gallup poll showed that 1 in 6 Americans thought Hitler was “doing the right thing” to the Jews. A 1940 poll found that nearly a fifth of Americans saw Jews as a national “menace” — more than any other group, including Germans. Almost a third anticipated “a widespread campaign against the Jews” — a campaign that 12 percent of Americans were willing to support.

The careers of anti-Semitic celebrities such as Catholic Rev. Charles Coughlin reflected the popular appeal of fascist ideas. Father Coughlin, as he was known, enjoyed the second-largest radio audience in the country (after President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fireside chats), frequently quoted Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, and praised the Nazi quest for full employment and racial purity. He broke with Roosevelt in 1934, forming his own party, whose 1936 candidate received nearly 1 million votes. Coughlin was finally silenced by the Catholic Church in early 1942…..
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/commentary/ct-trump-fascism-nazis-hitler-0170816-story.html


Fred Trump – Donald Trump’s father
In 1927, Donald Trump’s father was arrested after a Klan riot in Queens
By Philip Bump February 29, 2016

….On Memorial Day 1927, brawls erupted in New York led by sympathizers of the Italian fascist movement and the Ku Klux Klan. In the fascist brawl, which took place in the Bronx, two Italian men were killed by anti-fascists. In Queens, 1,000 white-robed Klansmen marched through the Jamaica neighborhood, eventually spurring an all-out brawl in which seven men were arrested.
One of those arrested was Fred Trump of 175-24 Devonshire Rd. in Jamaica.
This is Donald Trump’s father. Trump had a brother named Fred, but he wasn’t born until more than a decade later. The Fred Trump at Devonshire Road was the Fred C. Trump who lived there with his mother, according to the 1930 Census….

It’s not clear from the context what role Fred Trump played in the brawl. The news article simply notes that seven men were arrested in the “near-riot of the parade,” all of whom were represented by the same lawyers. Update: A contemporaneous article from the Daily Star notes that Trump was detained “on a charge of refusing to disperse from a parade when ordered to do so.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/02/28/in-1927-donald-trumps-father-was-arrested-after-a-klan-riot-in-queens/


All the Evidence We Could Find About Fred Trump’s Alleged Involvement with the KKK
Mike Pearl  Mar 10 2016
Newspaper clips obtained by VICE suggest the Republican frontrunner’s father may have worn the robe and hood of a Klansman in 1927.
Late last month, in an interview with Republican frontrunner Donald Trump, CNN host Jake Tapper asked the candidate whether he would disavow an endorsement from longtime Ku Klux Klan leader and white nationalist celebrity David Duke. Trump declined. “I don’t know anything about David Duke,” he said. Moments later, he added, “I know nothing about white supremacists.”

Trump has since walked back his comments, blaming his hesitance to condemn the Klan on a “bad earpiece.” The matter has now been filed away into the ever-growing archives of volatile statements Trump has made about race and ethnicity during the current election cycle—a list that includes kicking off his presidential campaign by calling Mexicans rapists, calling for the “‘total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States,” and commenting that perhaps a Black Lives Matter protester at one of his rallies “should have been roughed up.”

But the particulars of the David Duke incident call to mind yet another news story, one that suggests that Trump’s father, the late New York real estate titan Fred Trump, once wore the robe and hood of a Klansman.

Versions of this story emerged last September when Boing Boing dug up an old New York Times article from May of 1927 that listed a Fred Trump among those arrested at a Klan rally in Jamaica, Queens, when “1,000 Klansmen and 100 policemen staged a free-for-all,” in the streets. Donald Trump’s father would have been 21 in 1927 and had spent most of his life in Queens….

Moreover, three additional newspaper clips unearthed by VICE contain separate accounts of Fred Trump’s arrest at the May 1927 KKK rally in Queens, each of which seems to confirm the Times account of the events that day. While the clips don’t confirm whether Fred Trump was actually a member of the Klan, they do suggest that the rally—and the subsequent arrests—did happen, and did involve Donald Trump’s father, contrary to the candidate’s denials. A fifth article mentions the seven arrestees without giving names, and claims that all of the individuals arrested—presumably including Trump—were wearing Klan attire….
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/mvke38/all-the-evidence-we-could-find-about-fred-trumps-alleged-involvement-with-the-kkk

Trump’s position on Charlottesville has become even more pro-Nazi, Trump defends white supremacists

August 16, 2017 Comments Off on Trump’s position on Charlottesville has become even more pro-Nazi, Trump defends white supremacists

Trump’s position on Charlottesville has become even more pro-Nazi,  Trump defends white supremacists

“you also had people that were very fine people—on both sides” – Trump

– “Charlottesville: Watch VICE News Tonight’s full episode “Charlottesville: Race and Terror”
– Trump defends white supremacists
– Why are these politicians smiling next to white nationalists?
– Trump and Fascism : S.M.A.R.T.’s Ritual Abuse Pages


Trump’s position on Charlottesville has become even more pro-Nazi.

At a press conference in New York City to nominally promote his infrastructure bill, the president re-iterated his belief that both white supremacists and their opponents were at fault for the racial violence in Virginia this weekend. “You had a group on one side that was bad, and you had a group on the other side that was also very violent,” Trump said. In that one sentence, Trump returned to his original position that “many sides” bore responsibility, which comes after a transparently insincere attempt on Monday to blame neo-Nazis and white supremacists specifically.

But there’s more! Trump also gave a rousing endorsement of the white supremacists’ cause, saying that many “good people” had come to protest the planned removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee. He said that tearing down the statue of Lee was comparable to tearing down statues of George Washington or Thomas Jefferson.

“Not all of those people were neo-Nazis,” Trump asserted. “Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch. … You had some very bad people in that group, but you also had people that were very fine people—on both sides.”

As a factual matter, Trump’s statement is dubious: The event was openly organized by white supremacists, so it is unlikely that many “fine people” were at the rally. His latest remarks have only validated the suspicion that Trump sees white supremacists as a crucial part of his political alliance and that he is loath to alienate them. And the country’s racists like what they’re hearing….
https://newrepublic.com/minutes/144347/trumps-position-charlottesville-become-even-pro-nazi

“Charlottesville:
Watch VICE News Tonight’s full episode “Charlottesville: Race and Terror”

By Vice News Aug 15, 2017

On Saturday hundreds of white nationalists, alt-righters, and neo-Nazis traveled to Charlottesville, Virginia, to participate in the “Unite the Right” rally. By Saturday evening three people were dead – one protester and two police officers – and many more injured.

“VICE News Tonight” correspondent Elle Reeve went behind the scenes with white nationalist leaders, including Christopher Cantwell, Robert Ray, David Duke, and Matthew Heimbach — as well as counterprotesters. VICE News Tonight also spoke with residents of Charlottesville, members of the Black Lives Matter movement, and the Charlottesville Police.

From the neo-Nazi protests at Emancipation Park to Cantwell’s hideaway outside Virginia, “VICE News Tonight” provides viewers with exclusive, up-close and personal access inside the unrest….
https://news.vice.com/story/vice-news-tonight-full-episode-charlottesville-race-and-terror

Trump defends white supremacists
By Gabrielle Bluestone Aug 15, 2017

President Donald Trump defended the group of white supremacists who marched on Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend, telling reporters they were largely justified and being unfairly vilified by the media. The protests ended Saturday when one of the white supremacists drove his car into a crowd of people, killing one woman and injuring 19 others.

“What I’m saying is this: You had a group on one side and you had a group on the other and they came at each other with clubs and it was vicious and it was horrible and it was a horrible thing to watch,” he said at a Tuesday press conference in New York. “But there is another side. There was a group on this side, you can call them the left, that came violently attacking the other group. So you can say what you want but that’s the way it is.”

The press conference, which took place in the gold-plated lobby of Trump Tower, was to focus on infrastructure. But Trump quickly veered off-script into defending the white supremacists, pointing out that they had a permit to “innocently” protest, while the people who came to protest against them did not…..
https://news.vice.com/story/donald-trump-blames-alt-left-for-charlottesville-violence

Why are these politicians smiling next to white nationalists?
By Carter Sherman Aug 15, 2017
After violence erupted Saturday at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, a photo started circulating on social media showing Republican Rep. Tom Garrett of Virginia standing next to a smiling Jason Kessler — the man who organized Saturday’s “Unite the Right” rally.

Garrett quickly denounced Kessler, telling Fox News that he had no idea who Kessler was when he met with him. But Garrett isn’t the only politician who’s ended up associating with the white nationalists and supremacists who attended the “Unite the Right” rally — unwittingly or not. And while very few politicians tend to come into contact with such extremists, that status quo seems likely to be upended, as white nationalists and supremacists intensify their efforts to inject their ideas into mainstream politics.

“That [2016] election campaign unleashed some really bad demons in our society, and it emboldened these people that we saw in Charlottesville to think that they’re part of the system,” Heidi Beirich, who studies hate groups at the Southern Poverty Law Center, told VICE News.

Photo ops like Garrett’s can sometimes just happen — Garrett told Fox News that meeting unsavory constituents of his district, which includes Charlottesville, is an “occupational hazard.” (When asked for comment, Garrett’s team directed VICE News to his Fox News appearance.) Politicians can also get caught up at a public event and fail to properly vet the people they’re standing next to. That’s what Nevada Sen. Dean Heller, a Republican, said happened to him, after photo began circulating showing him standing next to Peter Cvjetanovic — a college student who confirmed to the Reno Gazette-Journal that he was both a white nationalist and had attended the Saturday march….

Then, at the other end of the spectrum, are the politicians who seem to confirm Beirich’s fears and actually court the white nationalist and supremacist vote. Former Virginia Rep. Virgil Goode, who served in Congress from 1997 to 2008, spoke at a March event for Kessler’s organization Unity and Security for America, according to the group’s Facebook page. Goode could not be reached for comment.

Corey Stewart, who is currently running for Tim Kaine’s Senate seat, has repeatedly appeared at events with Kessler, having made the preservation of the state’s Confederate monuments the linchpin of his failed gubernatorial campaign last year. (He very nearly won the Republican nomination, losing by just over one percentage point.) He told the Washington Post Sunday that he hadn’t talked to Kessler recently, saying, “He does his own thing.”

As of Sunday, though, Stewart was the only Virginian politician of either party not to condemn white nationalists. Instead, he blamed “half the violence” on Saturday counterprotesters….
https://news.vice.com/story/why-are-these-politicians-smiling-next-to-white-nationalists

Trump and Fascism : S.M.A.R.T.’s Ritual Abuse Pages
This page is a data dump of articles about Donald Trump, those working with Trump and historical articles about fascism. Fascism uses different types of mind control to control people. Donald Trump has been accused of using propaganda and mind control techniques to win the election, to control people’s opinions of him and to control their opinions of other topics. This page contains excerpts from articles related to this topic.  https://ritualabuse.us/mindcontrol/trump-and-fascism/

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