Donald Trump Rape Accuser Drops Suit, Janet Reno Frank Fuster County Walk Case, Appco Workers

November 8, 2016 Comments Off on Donald Trump Rape Accuser Drops Suit, Janet Reno Frank Fuster County Walk Case, Appco Workers

– Jane Doe Who Accused Trump of Raping Her When She Was 13 Drops Her Suit
– NIGHTMARE IN COUNTRY WALK
– What Beck Left Out
– Debunking Frontline’s – Did Daddy Do It? “”Frank Fuster was living the American dream.” Or so claims Frontline
– Appco: Workers allegedly forced to ‘shove cigarettes up bottoms’ after missing sales targets


Quotes on the County Walk Frank Fuster Case (sources below):


The Fuster case originated with a child spontaneously talking about being abused. That clear statement caused two families to withdraw their children from Fuster’s home daycare, which they did without informing anyone else. Months later, a spontaneous statement from a different child, started an investigation by law enforcement. An articulate 5-year-old boy was soon located, who gave several detailed statements that were later corroborated in various ways.”


“When the charges emerged in the home daycare case, Frank Fuster was on parole for sexually assaulting a 9-year-old two years earlier….the fact is that Fuster admitted in his parole violation hearing on the 1984 charges that, in the course of driving the girl home, he made her sit on his lap and he touched “her chest area” and “her vagina area.”


“Beck makes a point of saying that, despite claims about games involving feces, the police were “unable to find” any “feces smeared across the walls of the Fuster home” (p. 141). But he does not inform his readers that the police found a photo of precisely that: Frank’s son in a room smeared with feces on the floor and wall.”


“Beck acknowledges Frank Fuster’s 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a minor, but he quickly adds, without any apparent skepticism, that “Frank had always maintained his innocence.” (p. 142). But Beck does not tell his readers that Fuster actually admitted the actions charged in that case, and then tried to minimize them, while testifying at his Parole Violation Hearing three years later (Cheit, p. 337).”


“But Frank Fuster was not living the American dream. He was on probation for a 1982 child molestation conviction for a lewd and lascivious assault on an nine-year-old girl. Fuster also served four years in New York for manslaughter, after shooting a man in after a traffic accident and then threatening an off-duty policeman with his loaded rifle. His “new wife” was also his third wife, a girl barely sixteen years old whose status as an immigrant was unsure…And he gained custody of his son after threatening his ex-wife’s life if she contested the matter.”


“The things that Martha Fuster is willing to admit in this deposition are haunting, partly for the similarities to Ileana’s situation. Frank met Martha when she was sixteen; she lost her virginity and felt forced to marry Frank. Ileana confessed something similar to Shirley Blando and others at the prison, months before the psychologists were hired by her lawyer. And she used the word rape. (Blando deposition, State v. Fuster, August 1, 1985; tr. 78). Martha Fuster was kicked out of her house after Frank beat up her father (Martha Gonzalez Fuster Deposition tr., 13). Ileana’s mother remarried – and her new husband, Isreal Mendosa, called the police when Frank Fuster pulled a gun on him during an argument.”


“Also during this time, the police were called when Frank Fuster, in the heat of an argument, pulled a gun on Ileana’s step-father. In the year before the Country Walk case broke, Frank Fuster hit Ileana in the face repeatedly in front of other people at a Halloween party after she mentioned that he owned a gun.”


“In his own testimony in the Country Walk trial, Frank Fuster told so many lies that his lawyer was forced to admit as much to the jury in closing arguments. His most outrageous lie was one he maintained throughout the case: that he did not run a day care operation and that there was no Country Walk babysitting service. He also said “there were only a few children.”


Jane Doe Who Accused Trump of Raping Her When She Was 13 Drops Her Suit
By Dave Quinn and Diane Herbst November 5, 2016


The anonymous California woman who accused Donald Trump in a federal lawsuit of raping her in the ’90s when she was 13 has voluntarily dismissed her lawsuit, her attorney said late Friday….  Doe had accused the Republican presidential nominee of raping her during the summer of 1994, allegedly in the home of Jeffrey Epstein — a businessman and convicted sex offender also named in the lawsuit.  “Jane Doe instructed us to dismiss her lawsuit against Trump and Epstein today,” Bloom wrote….
  http://people.com/politics/donald-trump-rape-lawsuit-dismissed/


NIGHTMARE IN COUNTRY WALK
BY GLENN COLLINS December 14, 1986


UNSPEAKABLE ACTS By Jan Hollingsworth. Illustrated. 592 pp. New York: Congdon & Weed. $18.95.


OF Susan, a parent who suspects that her child has been sexually abused, ”Unspeakable Acts” tells us: ”Susan said she couldn’t rest until she knew the truth. She wouldn’t rest afterward, either.” Readers of Jan Hollingsworth’s account of a widely publicized Florida child-abuse case may feel the same. In its lurid details, its frustrating complexity and in the agony of the children and families who were victimized, this case would seem to be the paradigm of incidents in Minnesota, California and elsewhere that have surfaced in recent years. A startling difference, though, is the outcome: the molester was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.


Indeed, after reading Ms. Hollingsworth’s description of the trial, it seems almost a miracle that, in October 1985, the owner of the Country Walk Babysitting Service, one Frank Fuster, was found guilty of 14 counts of abuse. ”It was an almost perfect crime,” Ms. Hollingsworth comments, and this could be said of child sexual abuse in general, since it is usually committed in the absence of witnesses or corroboration other than the testimony of the small victims.


Mr. Fuster was convicted of molesting the children entrusted to his wife’s care in their home in the middle-class Dade County suburb of Country Walk, a planned development that was intended to be an idyllic refuge from the anxieties of urban Miami.


Of course, given the media coverage, the triumph of the Fuster prosecution was a consuming matter for Dade County residents. But the importance of the case transcends Floridians’ concerns. This book is almost a primer for parents, criminal justice personnel and social service workers in the do’s and don’ts of attempting to prevent, and make prosecutable, ”the most unprosecutable crime in the nation,” as the book describes it.


….Her presentation of the case includes trial testimony and the verbatim reports of psychiatrists and polygraph operators, and it may be too thorough for some readers’ taste. But it has a mesmerizing quality that makes this book as compelling as it is heartrending.


Readers are likely to recoil from accounts of Mr. Fuster’s actions. It is sickening stuff. But such details account for both the public attention accorded the case and the outrage that animated parents and prosecutors alike – indignation that led to Mr. Fuster’s life sentence. Mr. Fuster’s unspeakable acts were more than just the repeated sexual abuse of children; the victims also testified that he led them in satanic rituals in which both crucifixes and excrement played a part. Some of the children’s most disturbing testimony involved descriptions of the ways in which he terrorized them: one method was to force them to watch him mutilate pet birds, an object lesson to tots who might disclose the abuse. THE author cites the specifics of these revolting rituals to illustrate disturbing similarities in some of the multiple-victim sexual-abuse cases that have recently been discovered in other states. She suggests that such acts are fostered by a nationwide network of pedophiles who swap information and videotapes in a mega-dollar child-pornography business the F.B.I. would do well to target….

http://www.nytimes.com/1986/12/14/books/nightmare-in-country-walk.html


Mythical Numbers and Satanic Ritual Abuse

Sep 10, 2014  Ross Cheit Professor at Brown University


The Fuster case originated with a child spontaneously talking about being abused. That clear statement caused two families to withdraw their children from Fuster’s home daycare, which they did without informing anyone else. Months later, a spontaneous statement from a different child, started an investigation by law enforcement. An articulate 5-year-old boy was soon located, who gave several detailed statements that were later corroborated in various ways. The case was tagged by some as “satanic ritual abuse” because children made statements about Fuster wearing masks, killing a bird and playing with feces. Those allegations quietly disappeared from the witch-hunt narrative when adult testimony and photographic evidence corroborated these statements. But the satanic tag lived on. The leading academic psychologists on child suggestibility still claim that the case was filled with “fantastic” elements like “riding a shark.” But the only child who said anything close to that was describing a Jacques Cousteau program. Hardly a matter of satanic ritual abuse.


When the charges emerged in the home daycare case, Frank Fuster was on parole for sexually assaulting a 9-year-old two years earlier. The jury that convicted Fuster in 1985 was unaware of this prior conviction. But others who have embraced Frank Fuster as innocent know about it and claim that lighting struck twice — Fuster was innocent the first time, too. But the fact is that Fuster admitted in his parole violation hearing on the 1984 charges that, in the course of driving the girl home, he made her sit on his lap and he touched “her chest area” and “her vagina area.”….

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ross-cheit/mythical-numbers-and-sata_b_5578078.html


What Beck Left Out


August 8, 2015


The witch-hunt narrative, as described in my book, has deep roots in American culture. It ranges from Salem Massachusetts to the McCarthy hearings of the 1950s. The power of those cautionary tales, however, causes many people to drop their skeptical guard when told that something is a modern day witch-hunt. So it is with the conventional wisdom about the highly publicized day-care sexual abuse cases from the 1980s.


Richard Beck, a comparative literature major from Harvard who works at a literary magazine, is the latest one spreading the witch-hunt narrative about those cases. His book, We Believe the Children, based largely on secondary sources, reaches the same conclusions that Debbie Nathan and defense lawyer Michael Snedeker offered twenty years ago. In both instances, the authors repeatedly omitted significant evidence that contradicts the witch-hunt narrative. Consider some examples of what Beck left out:….


Beck makes a point of saying that, despite claims about games involving feces, the police were “unable to find” any “feces smeared across the walls of the Fuster home” (p. 141). But he does not inform his readers that the police found a photo of precisely that: Frank’s son in a room smeared with feces on the floor and wall. Beck also omits any mention that Debbie Nathan, his primary source for the book, once acknowledged that it “appears that [Frank Fuster] perpetrated sadomasochistic assaults against [Ileana, his wife] (who was legally a minor) and possibly against the younger children, including abuse involving urine and excrement” (Cheit, p. 327, fn. 125). When characterizing the case as “satanic ritual abuse,” Beck does not acknowledge that evidence, but he mentions that there were allegations involving masks (pp. xiii). But Beck omits the fact that masks were found in Fuster’s house and that adults testified in the case about being scared by Frank Fuster using them (Cheit, pp. 297-98, 331).


Beck repeats the claim that Ileana Fuster was held naked in an isolation cell in the Country Walk case (p. 143). But he does not acknowledge that Ileana Fuster made no such claim in the actual motion she brought concerning her treatment in prison, while being held. In that motion, alleging “cruel and unusual punishment,” Ileana Fuster complained of things like having “only limited access to shower facilities” and “only limited access to hot water for coffee.” There was nothing in her motion about being held nude (Cheit, p. 333). Beck also neglects to inform his readers that Ileana Fuster denied that she had been held naked when asked about it years later, by defense lawyer Arthur Cohen, in an interview that Beck cites elsewhere with approval (Cheit, p. 335).


Beck acknowledges Frank Fuster’s 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a minor, but he quickly adds, without any apparent skepticism, that “Frank had always maintained his innocence.” (p. 142). But Beck does not tell his readers that Fuster actually admitted the actions charged in that case, and then tried to minimize them, while testifying at his Parole Violation Hearing three years later (Cheit, p. 337). Here is how Fuster explained what he did to a 9-year-old while driving her home one night:


This is how I touch her chest area. I don’t see any sexual movement here. I also touch her in the vaginal area. That’s it. That’s the whole case.


Nor does Beck acknowledge Frank Fuster’s long record of documented lies about his manslaughter conviction. As I said in The Witch-Hunt Narrative: “one wonders how anyone could cite his denials with utter credulity and without any acknowledgment of the considerable evidence to the contrary” (Cheit, p. 338).


Beck also impugns the most important child in the Fuster case without acknowledging that he never examined the first interview with that child, an interview that played a major role in the case. Psychology professor James Wood recently admitted that he and Debbie Nathan, his co-author for a forthcoming commentary on my book, never examined this interview, which Wood described as “key for understanding the case” (Wood, personal communication; July 18, 2015)….


In many of the cases proclaimed to be witch hunts, looking closely at the record revealed substantial evidence of abuse and compelling reasons that jurors voted to convict. It’s true that I also found cases where people were charged who shouldn’t have been. Yet even in some of those cases, there was strong evidence of abuse. A crime was committed and a child was assaulted by someone who was never apprehended, but only the false accusation story lives on….

http://blogs.brown.edu/rcheit/2015/08/08/what-beck-left-out/


Debunking Frontline’s – Did Daddy Do It? “”Frank Fuster was living the American dream.” Or so claims Frontline
…for the 4/25/02 program, “Did Daddy Do It?” Fuster had “a new house in the suburbs, a successful landscaping business, and a new wife.” Then, according to the highly-acclaimed PBS program, Fuster “found himself” charged with sexually abusing children in their home day care. His subsequent conviction, considered ironclad by many, was the target of this hour-long program. But Frank Fuster was not living the American dream. He was on probation for a 1982 child molestation conviction for a lewd and lascivious assault on an nine-year-old girl. Fuster also served four years in New York for manslaughter, after shooting a man in after a traffic accident and then threatening an off-duty policeman with his loaded rifle. His “new wife” was also his third wife, a girl barely sixteen years old whose status as an immigrant was unsure…And he gained custody of his son after threatening his ex-wife’s life if she contested the matter.”
https://web.archive.org/web/20070404174438/http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Taubman_Center/PBS/


Frank Fuster gained custody of his son after threatening his ex-wife’s life if she contested the matter


Source: State v. Escalona [Fuster], Case No. 84-19728, Deposition of Martha Gonzales Fuster (August 8, 1985), tr. 58-60 (“he told me that he would kill me,” “if I ever took Noel away,” “he would kill me if I took Noel,” “afraid of him.”)


The things that Martha Fuster is willing to admit in this deposition are haunting, partly for the similarities to Ileana’s situation. Frank met Martha when she was sixteen; she lost her virginity and felt forced to marry Frank. Ileana confessed something similar to Shirley Blando and others at the prison, months before the psychologists were hired by her lawyer. And she used the word rape. (Blando deposition, State v. Fuster, August 1, 1985; tr. 78). Martha Fuster was kicked out of her house after Frank beat up her father (Martha Gonzalez Fuster Deposition tr., 13). Ileana’s mother remarried – and her new husband, Isreal Mendosa, called the police when Frank Fuster pulled a gun on him during an argument.


Further contradicting the “American Dream” image painted by Frontline, Fuster has acknowledged (and Jan Hollingsworth reported) that he was the subject of a criminal complaint for rape 1980.


Fuster was also the victim of a close-range gunshot to the face in 1980. The authorities were told it was a robbery; but nothing was stolen and the act appeared to be personal. The authorities speculated that it was an act of revenge. Also during this time, the police were called when Frank Fuster, in the heat of an argument, pulled a gun on Ileana’s step-father. In the year before the Country Walk case broke, Frank Fuster hit Ileana in the face repeatedly in front of other people at a Halloween party after she mentioned that he owned a gun.


Having a gun was a violation of Frank Fuster’s parole conditions—for his 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a nine-year-old girl….


Frank Fuster’s documented history of deception about this case


In his own testimony in the Country Walk trial, Frank Fuster told so many lies that his lawyer was forced to admit as much to the jury in closing arguments. His most outrageous lie was one he maintained throughout the case: that he did not run a day care operation and that there was no Country Walk babysitting service. He also said “there were only a few children.” Then in an impromptu press conference while the jury was out, Fuster argued “she babysat 50 kids and they only had seven here, how come”? (The answer, of course, is that many children were too young to testify, others did not want to, and other’s were not thought to have been abused by the Fusters.)


Fuster also lied to his lawyer. Exasperated, he told the judge that he was tired of “only getting abuse” from Fuster. (Magistrate’s Report, p. 25) Later, he used his lawyer’s conclusion that he was “an unmitigated liar” as one of his alleged grounds from appeal! (Magistrate’s Report, p. 113) Fuster eventually lied to the judge about why his own lawyer wanted out of the case. The judge called him on this lie….

https://web.archive.org/web/20070206102956/http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Taubman_Center/PBS/intro.html#3


Appco: Workers allegedly forced to ‘shove cigarettes up bottoms’ after missing sales targets

By the National Reporting Team’s Lorna Knowles and Elise Worthington


Young charity workers were forced to lick underwear, cross dress and take part in obscene cigarette rituals, according to lawyers suing the marketing giant Appco.


The shocking allegations are the latest to emerge as part of an $85 million class action against the Appco Group in the Federal Court of Australia.


The Appco Group is one of the world’s biggest fundraising agencies and rattles the tin on behalf of some of Australia’s best known charities, including Surf Life Saving Australia and The Starlight Foundation.


But its workers, sometimes known as “charity muggers” or “chuggers”, claim they were overworked, grossly underpaid and bullied.


Lawyer Rory Markham told the ABC more than 500 former workers had come forward since he filed the class action against the Appco Group last month.


Mr Markham said some alleged that they were forced to cross dress, take part in “cockfights” and lick underpants if they did not meet their daily sales targets.


Workers in Tasmania also allege they were forced to participate in an obscene ritual involving cigarettes….

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-05/fresh-allegations-of-bizarre-rituals-at-marketing-giant-appco/7996710 

We Believe the Children – What Beck Left Out, Pakistan child abuse video case – 400 videos of 280 minors – 20 to 25 people abused the children

August 12, 2015 Comments Off on We Believe the Children – What Beck Left Out, Pakistan child abuse video case – 400 videos of 280 minors – 20 to 25 people abused the children

Richard Beck admits that his work is not investigative journalism. He describes it as history. But historians do not rely on secondary sources for major arguments and historians do not omit evidence for the sake of telling a simplified story.

Pakistan:
a gang of 20 to 25 people had abused the children between 2009 and 2014
around 400 videos were made of 280 minors

What Beck Left Out
August 8, 2015
By Ross E. Cheit

The witch-hunt narrative, as described in my book, has deep roots in American culture. It ranges from Salem Massachusetts to the McCarthy hearings of the 1950s. The power of those cautionary tales, however, causes many people to drop their skeptical guard when told that something is a modern day witch-hunt. So it is with the conventional wisdom about the highly publicized day-care sexual abuse cases from the 1980s.

Richard Beck, a comparative literature major from Harvard who works at a literary magazine, is the latest one spreading the witch-hunt narrative about those cases. His book, We Believe the Children, based largely on secondary sources, reaches the same conclusions that Debbie Nathan and defense lawyer Michael Snedeker offered twenty years ago. In both instances, the authors repeatedly omitted significant evidence that contradicts the witch-hunt narrative. Consider some examples of what Beck left out:

Beck reduces all of the medical evidence in the McMartin case to a single paragraph and insinuates that there was no credible medical evidence substantiating sexual abuse (pp. 155-56). But Beck does not tell his readers that even defense lawyer Danny Davis allowed that the genital injuries on one girl were “serious and convincing.” Beck also did not mention that the vaginal injuries on another girl, one of the three involved in both McMartin trials, were considered as proving sexual abuse “to a medical certainty.” Beck also fails to mention that the case began when Judy Johnson saw a drop of blood. Beck allows that the boy was examined twice and, as he put it, both doctors reported suspected child abuse (p. 34). But Beck did not disclose the basis for those reports: the Emergency Room doctor observed the “red and roughened” area around the boy’s anus, concluding that there “appeared to be some friction like trauma to the rectal area.” The pediatric expert who subsequently examined the boy described discolored bruising patterns and said that his anal injury “was within the last week” (Cheit, p. 25). That is why Ray Buckey was arrested….

Beck discusses the Kniffen and McCuan case from Bakersfield, California, presenting them as victims of a witch-hunt (pp. 70-72). But Beck never mentions considerable medical evidence against the McCuans, including vaginal scarring and trauma to the lining of the anus, that occurred between 1980 and 1982 (when Rod Phelps was away). Debbie Nathan once wrote that this evidence “seriously weakened Alvin and Debbie’s protestations of innocence.” But Beck ignored this evidence entirely, also neglecting to mention that the McCuan daughters, unlike the Kniffen sons, have never recanted their claims against their parents. Finally, Beck notes that the convictions of the Kniffens and McCuans were set aside, but he does not reveal that the judge opined that “it may be that all of the acts reported actually occurred” (Cheit, pp. 119-123)….

Beck claims that “no pornography” was ever found in any of these cases (p. xvi). But he neglects to mention that Isabel’s Day Care, not far from the McMartin Preschool, had exactly that kind of evidence. So did the Rainbow Day Care Center case in Fort Lauderdale. So did Robert Shell’s case in Massachusetts. Also, two defendants in the Bakersfield cases were convicted partly because there was photographic evidence of their sexual abuse of children: Charles Bishop and Grant Self (Cheit, pp. 163-165).

Beck also claims that Jesse Friedman, who pleaded guilty to child sex abuse charges, was falsely convicted (pp. 173-181). But he does not mention that Friedman failed two lie detectors, both arranged by his own lawyer, and that the psychological evaluation, also arranged by his own lawyer, concluded that Friedman was a “psychopathic deviant” who was “capable of committing the crimes with which he was charged.” Beck also does not mention that he has never spoken to a single one of the fourteen men who formed the basis for the case. This is significant since Andrew Jarecki, who directed the film, never spoke to the vast majority of actual complainants in the case, either. Nor does Beck acknowledge that two of those men wrote a letter in 2004, objecting to the movie, and attesting to sexual abuse by Jesse Friedman (Cheit, pp. 130-133)….

Beck acknowledges Frank Fuster’s 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a minor, but he quickly adds, without any apparent skepticism, that “Frank had always maintained his innocence.” (p. 142). But Beck does not tell his readers that Fuster actually admitted the actions charged in that case, and then tried to minimize them, while testifying at his Parole Violation Hearing three years later (Cheit, p. 337). Here is how Fuster explained what he did to a 9-year-old while driving her home one night:

This is how I touch her chest area. I don’t see any sexual movement here. I also touch her in the vaginal area. That’s it. That’s the whole case.

Nor does Beck acknowledge Frank Fuster’s long record of documented lies about his manslaughter conviction. As I said in The Witch-Hunt Narrative: “one wonders how anyone could cite his denials with utter credulity and without any acknowledgment of the considerable evidence to the contrary” (Cheit, p. 338)….

Richard Beck admits that his work is not investigative journalism (p. xxv). He describes it as history. But historians do not rely on secondary sources for major arguments and historians do not omit evidence for the sake of telling a simplified story. A comprehensive examination of the actual transcripts—something that Beck did not do in a single case beyond McMartin—reveals a different picture. As I wrote last summer:

In many of the cases proclaimed to be witch hunts, looking closely at the record revealed substantial evidence of abuse and compelling reasons that jurors voted to convict. It’s true that I also found cases where people were charged who shouldn’t have been. Yet even in some of those cases, there was strong evidence of abuse. A crime was committed and a child was assaulted by someone who was never apprehended, but only the false accusation story lives on.

And so it is with Richard Beck’s history of these cases.
http://blogs.brown.edu/rcheit/2015/08/08/what-beck-left-out/

7 charged in Pakistan child abuse video case
By Sophia Saifi, Ralph Ellis and Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
Tue August 11, 2015

Kasur, Pakistan (CNN) Seven people accused of blackmailing scores of children into making sex videos and then blackmailing them again by threatening to sell the recordings have been arrested in Pakistan’s Punjab province.

Police Officer Rai Babar Saeed said a gang of 20 to 25 people had abused the children between 2009 and 2014 in the village of Hussain Khan Wala in the Kasur district.

Chaudhary Hamid, a villager, said the gang blackmailed the children into engaging in sexual activity again and again to stop the videos from being leaked. Parents were also blackmailed, he said.

At least one CD shop in Kasur had been selling the videos, Saeed said. In most of the videos, the faces of criminals are not shown, but the child’s face can be seen clearly, the officer said.

Latif Sara, a lawyer representing parents of the abused children and the head of a nongovernmental organization called Children Abuse Protection, said 274 videos had been circulated.

According to a survey by the group last week, one in three of the 500 households questioned in the district of Kasur had a child who had been sexually abused, Sara said.

CNN affiliate Geo TV reported higher numbers, saying around 400 videos were made of 280 minors…. http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/10/asia/pakistan-child-abuse/

Number of arrests in child abuse scandal rises to 14  August 10, 2015
KASUR: The number of accused arrested in the child abuse scandal has risen to 14 after police made two more arrests on Monday.

The arrests came after the interim bail extension of five accused was denied by a local court. Police said seven accused are on judicial remand.

Main accused confesses

Haseeb Amir, the main accused of Kasur child abuse scandal, has confessed to subjecting children to abuse and making their videos.

SP Investigation Kasur said that in a statement given to the police the main accused of the child abuse scandal admitted to committing the crime of sexually abusing children and capturing the same in videos.

On Saturday, the nation was shocked by reports of gang of criminals producing and selling illicit videos of child sexual abuse in Ganda Singh Wala area of Kasur in Punjab province for the last 10 years.

Investigations into the massive child sexual abuse scandal – termed the biggest in the country’s history – revealed that around 400 videos were made of 280 minor victims of sexual abuse by the organised gang of over 25 criminals.

Several parents of victims were consistently blackmailed and coerced into paying hundreds of thousands of rupees with threats of releasing the videos in public. Reports said families in the locality were helpless as officials all along remained apathetic to the incident….
http://www.geo.tv/article-193765-Number-of-arrests-in-child-abuse-scandal-rises-to-14

The Witch-Hunt Narrative: “most of the charges brought against child molesters were grounded in some truth”

September 13, 2014 Comments Off on The Witch-Hunt Narrative: “most of the charges brought against child molesters were grounded in some truth”

Research By the Dozens
By Lawrence Goodman  September/October 2014

….More than fifteen years in the making, The Witch-Hunt Narrative examines dozens of child sexual abuse cases from the 1980s. Over time, these cases ensnared dozens of defendants, some of whom were eventually cleared of any wrongdoing. Many experts believed these prosecutions came about when interrogators asked young children leading questions, resulting in a witch-hunt in which wrongful accusations were made against thousands of people.

Thanks in part to the work of Brown students, Cheit reviewed all the so-called witch-hunt cases and concluded that most of the charges brought against child molesters were grounded in some truth. At the very least, he says, there was enough credible evidence to begin police investigations.

Cheit, who holds a law degree and is also a professor of public policy, believes we are far too quick to dismiss the accounts of young children. “We have, over the last twenty years,” he writes in The Witch-Hunt Narrative, “discounted the word of children who might testify against sexual abuse. We have become more worried about overreacting to child sexual abuse than we are about underreacting to it.”….
http://www.brownalumnimagazine.com/content/view/3759/31/

How the ‘Witch Hunt’ Myth Undermined American Justice

July 13, 2014 Comments Off on How the ‘Witch Hunt’ Myth Undermined American Justice

How the ‘Witch Hunt’ Myth Undermined American Justice
Jason Berry  07.12.14

Innocent people persecuted by a legal system out of control? In The Witch-Hunt Narrative, Ross E. Cheit argues the media and courts have gone too far in dismissing evidence of abuse….

Accusations of ritual abuse and grisly cult behavior with Satanic overtones have been discussed at conferences on child abuse and treated in research literature since the mid-’80s. Kenneth Lanning, an FBI agent who specialized in child-abuse investigations for many years, found no evidence “of a well-organized Satanic cult” and said so in a research guide. And yet, writes Cheit, even though the FBI guide became Exhibit A for those scoffing at charges of Satanic abuse, “it actually recognized many activities described as ritual abuse and it cautions that there might be plausible explanations for children making such statements in other cases about sexual abuse.”

The absence of a well-organized cult does not mean the absence of ritualized abuse. Cheit provides several pages of numbing case studies on people who were prosecuted, sometimes with testimony from their traumatized children who finally grew old enough to unburden themselves. In Florida, a monster named Eddie Lee Sexton Sr. “ran his family like a cult, subjecting them to the kinds of rituals that…others claim is only imaginary,” Cheit reports. Sexton’s children showed authorities the burial place of an infant he had murdered. “Sexton, who told his children he was the devil, inflicted horrendous torture on his family, including sexual abuse.”

The most controversial case that Cheit explores, and the one he calls “the turning point” in the journalistic development of a witch-hunt narrative, is that of Margaret Kelly Michaels. In 1985, Michaels was arrested on the testimony of children at a New Jersey day-care center where she had worked. An attractive woman in her twenties, Michaels was convicted on 96 of 131 counts, with young children testifying. Michaels took the stand and denied the accusations.

Michaels was imprisoned while awaiting trial. An inmate she befriended would later testify that Michaels told her, “I didn’t mean to hurt those children.” The inmate had already been sentenced and made no deal with prosecutors. Cheit continues:

The jury did not hear additional evidence concerning disturbing sexual behavior in the Michaels family. The state offered evidence about her being groped by her father during an early jail visit. The incident was documented at the time and the prosecution found out about it only because a correctional official in a barbershop was heard talking about it… The judge deemed it too prejudicial to present to the jury….
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/07/12/how-the-witch-hunt-myth-undermined-american-justice.html

There’s no evidence of hundreds of cases of false convictions of child sexual abuse in this era, “Evidence of abuse in the Keller case has been minimized or denied”, Westminster ‘chumocracy’ has protected itself from paedophile revelations, claims Cameron’s advisor

July 12, 2014 Comments Off on There’s no evidence of hundreds of cases of false convictions of child sexual abuse in this era, “Evidence of abuse in the Keller case has been minimized or denied”, Westminster ‘chumocracy’ has protected itself from paedophile revelations, claims Cameron’s advisor

Mythical Numbers and Satanic Ritual Abuse
Ross Cheit  Professor at Brown University 07/11/2014

There’s no evidence of hundreds of cases of false convictions of child sexual abuse in this era. In my new book, The Witch-Hunt Narrative, I examine dozens of specific cases from the 1980s and early 90s that are said to be wrongful prosecutions or wrongful convictions. Aided by dozens of research assistants, I spent fifteen years doing the painstaking work of original trial court research to figure out what kind of evidence actually existed in these cases….

In many of the cases proclaimed to be witch hunts, looking closely at the record revealed substantial evidence of abuse and compelling reasons that jurors voted to convict. It’s true that I also found cases where people were charged who shouldn’t have been. Yet even in some of those cases, there was strong evidence of abuse. A crime was committed and a child was assaulted by someone who was never apprehended, but only the false accusation story lives on…..

on the day that the 3-year-old complained to her mother about Dan Keller pulling down her pants and spanking her at day-care, she later screamed while she was urinating, “It hurts, it hurts.” That prompted her mother to take the preschooler to the emergency room.

The emergency room doctor found what he believed were two physical indications of sexual abuse: “what appeared to be lacerations of the hymen” and “a tear of the posterior fourchette,” a fold of skin on the vagina. It might surprise readers to learn that a year after the 1991 added emergency room visit, the doctor “didn’t have any independent recollection” of the exam and testified entirely from the medical records.

….omits that fact in reporting that, when contacted by a newspaper in 2009, the doctor described a revelation that supposedly happened “years after” the trial. We don’t know what year. But according to Dr. Mouw, while attending a professional training seminar, he saw a slide about normal variations in hymens and realized that what he thought had been lacerations in the Keller case were probably innocuous. In 2013, Dr. Mouw filed an affidavit to this effect. Notably, the affidavit does not withdraw his finding of a vaginal tear, which had been the more certain of his original findings….

Douglas Perry, a friend of the Kellers, confessed to being at a beer-and-sex party where adults sexually abused a boy and a girl who were under the Kellers’ care. He said that, “Fran had a pen and was sticking it in and out of the little girl’s vagina.” He identified the 3-year-old girl from the trial in a videotape. Perry later recanted his confession, but he also pleaded guilty to “indecency with a child by contact.” ….

The Fuster case originated with a child spontaneously talking about being abused. That clear statement caused two families to withdraw their children from Fuster’s home daycare, which they did without informing anyone else. Months later, a spontaneous statement from a different child, started an investigation by law enforcement. An articulate 5-year-old boy was soon located, who gave several detailed statements that were later corroborated in various ways. The case was tagged by some as “satanic ritual abuse” because children made statements about Fuster wearing masks, killing a bird and playing with feces. Those allegations quietly disappeared from the witch-hunt narrative when adult testimony and photographic evidence corroborated these statements….

When the charges emerged in the home daycare case, Frank Fuster was on parole for sexually assaulting a 9-year-old two years earlier. The jury that convicted Fuster in 1985 was unaware of this prior conviction….But the fact is that Fuster admitted in his parole violation hearing on the 1984 charges that, in the course of driving the girl home, he made her sit on his lap and he touched “her chest area” and “her vagina area.”….

But what did Judy Johnson do to set off the “witch-hunt?” She saw a spot of blood on her son’s anus and called the police, who told her to take him to a doctor, which she did. She was then referred to a pediatric specialist, who reported to the Manhattan Beach Police Department that “the victim’s anus was forcibly entered several days ago.” That’s why the original defendant, Ray Buckey, was arrested….

even the defense lawyer, Danny Davis, allowed that the genital injuries on one girl were “serious and convincing.” (His main argument to the jury was that much of the time that this girl attended McMartin was outside the statute of limitations.) They don’t mention that vaginal injuries on another girl, one of the three involved in both McMartin trials, were described by a pediatrician as proving sexual abuse “to a medical certainty.”….

many jurors believed the original defendant Ray Buckey was guilty and voted to convict him. Within an hour after the first trial ended in a hung jury, seven jurors held a press conference to announce that they thought children had been sexually abused. They spoke about the difficulty in proving such claims “beyond a reasonable doubt.”….

Now, while the media publicizes sexual abuse stories about celebrities and cover-ups of abuse in the past, and repeats the mythical numbers from the witch-hunt narrative, they overlook a real number that concerns real victims — the number of children being sexually abused today. It’s a major public health problem that gets almost no attention at all.

While this type of crime is, not surprisingly, difficult to quantify, studies over many years have found that 20 percent of women and 5 to 10 percent of men report having been sexually abused as children. Just last month, a study in the American Journal of Public Health showed much higher rates of male victimization than previously thought. There’s every reason to believe that child sexual abuse is still widespread. Yet how often do the media delve into that real problem? How often do they examine the enormous gap between the number of children — judging from studies — being abused today and the number of their abusers who end up in court, much less in prison? ….
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ross-cheit/mythical-numbers-and-sata_b_5578078.html

Evidence in the Keller Case
July 10, 2014

This post elaborates on some of the evidence in the Keller case, discussed in an article that was just published on Huffington Post. The article, which is about the witch-hunt narrative writ large, argues that the evidence of abuse in the Keller case has been minimized or denied, while the “satanic” aspects of the case, which were never part of the charges, have been exaggerated.

Dr. Mouw’s Testimony

The Keller case began the day that a mother took her daughter to the Emergency Room, after the little girl screamed “It hurts, it hurts” while urinating. The Emergency Room doctor, Dr. Michael Mouw, found two different signs of sexual abuse. Seventeen years later, the doctor told a reporter that his diagnosis was likely incorrect.

Dr. Mouw’s claim has been accepted at face value, without any apparent skepticism or scrutiny by those advancing the witch-hunt narrative. Yet, on close examination, there are two reasons to discount Dr. Mouw’s current claim. First and foremost, it is flatly contradicted by his testimony in 1992, when he said repeatedly that he had “no independent recollection” of the exam….

Second, even accepting what Dr. Mouw now says at face value, his current position, contained in this affidavit filed in 2013, contradicts only one of the two findings in his 1992 report. Dr. Mouw claims that the “lacerations” he reported seeing in two places in the girl’s vagina were probably normal hymenal variations. But his affidavit did not withdraw his finding of a “tear in the posterior fourchette.”….

A civil complaint filed by the parents of one of the children who attended the Keller’s home daycare contains the allegation that a “longtime friend and confident” of Francis Keller was told about “Daniel Keller’s abusive habit toward children” (p. 2). If this allegation is true, it provides additional support, beyond the word of the children, for the allegation against the Kellers. But this evidence was never heard in court because the defendants were ultimately successful in an appeal that argued that such causes of action should not be allowed in Texas.
http://blogs.brown.edu/rcheit/2014/07/10/keller/

Westminster ‘chumocracy’ has protected itself from paedophile revelations, claims Cameron’s advisor on child abuse

Claire Perry says politicians have ‘out of touch sense of entitlement’
Tory junior minister launched blistering attack on establishment cover up
Comes after Theresa May this week launched two probes into historic abuse

By Tom Mctague, Mail Online Deputy Political Editor  11 July 2014

David Cameron’s advisor on child abuse has lashed out at the Westminster ‘chumocracy’ that has protected itself from allegations of paedophilia.

Tory junior minister Claire Perry said Parliament was full of ‘too many people with the same interests and the same out-of-touch sense of entitlement coming together to protect their own’.

Her damning remarks come amid allegations that a paedophile network was operating in Westminster and was being protected by senior politicians….

Miss Perry added: ‘The other, and more worrying part of the problem is the way that the voices of victims were ignored for so long – children told to keep quiet, ridiculed, or threatened – with tragically the most vulnerable of all being more likely to be targeted for abuse.

‘That, to me, is the real scandal and we must do all we can to make sure that when victims speak out they are heard and action is taken.”….
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2688622/Westminster-chumocracy-protected-paedophile-revelations-claims-Cameron-s-advisor-child-abuse.html

 

Horrific truths of treatment emerge from Catholic mother and baby homes, Norwich child abuse inquiry police charge woman with rapes, The Witch-Hunt Narrative By Ross E. Cheit

June 15, 2014 Comments Off on Horrific truths of treatment emerge from Catholic mother and baby homes, Norwich child abuse inquiry police charge woman with rapes, The Witch-Hunt Narrative By Ross E. Cheit

Horrific truths of treatment emerge from Catholic mother and baby homes
Niall O’Dowd June 14,2014

There are some undeniable facts about the unmarried mother’s homes in Ireland from the time they were established in the 1920s until they were closed sometime in the 1960s.

Children died needlessly by the thousands in them. Many, possibly 800 in Galway, were buried without coffins, thrown in the earth, some in a septic tank….

Here is what happened there.  A conscientious health official, Dr .James Deeny, visited, and here are his exact words written in 1951:

“Shortly afterwards, when in Cork, I went to Bessborough. It was a beautiful institution, built on to a lovely old house just before the war, and seemed to be well-run and spotlessly clean. I marched up and down and around about and could not make out what was wrong; at last I took a notion and stripped all the babies and, unusually for a Chief Medical Adviser, examined them.

“Every baby had some purulent infection of the skin and all had green diarrhea, carefully covered up. There was obviously a staphylococcus infection about.

“Without any legal authority I closed the place down and sacked the matron, a nun, and also got rid of the medical officer.

“The deaths had been going on for years. They had done nothing.”

One year later under a new regime, less than one percent of babies perished from a high of over 60 percent….

It was all a part of the punishment ritual for the poor unloved unmarried mothers who suffered horrifically. Even if their children survived they were ripped away from them and sent abroad for adoption.

They were made to cut grass with scissors, forced to endure child birth without any painkilling drugs, denied stitches when wounds were opened – all testified to by local nurses and doctors who seemed helpless to stop the horrific suffering….
http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Horrific-truths-of-treatment-emerge-from-Catholic-mother-and-baby-homes.html

Norwich child abuse inquiry police charge woman with rapes 14 June 2014
A woman has appeared in court accused of raping and abusing children.

Marie Black, 33, of Atkinson Close in Norwich, was charged with 24 offences on Friday night and appeared before the city’s magistrates.

The charges relate to five victims under the age of 13 and are alleged to have happened between 2004 and 2010.

She faces five counts of child cruelty, four rapes and related offences. She was released on bail and is due before Norwich Crown Court on 27 June.

Ms Black is the ninth person to be charged in connection with the child abuse investigation.

Eight men and women were charged in connection with the case in February 2014. They are all on conditional bail to appear at Norwich Crown Court at a future date….
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-norfolk-27850220

The Witch-Hunt Narrative By Ross E. Cheit
Based on a comprehensive examination of primary sources, The Witch-Hunt Narrative challenges the conventional wisdom about these cases. Ross Cheit uses trial transcripts and related court documents to demonstrate that many of the cases at the core of the witch-hunt narrative involved compelling evidence of abuse. He focuses on three major cases while also surveying dozens more, including some that involved injustice to the defendants. He finds that in many cases the conventional wisdom is significantly overdrawn.

Cheit’s years of research also revealed a history of minimizing and denying abuse, and a surprisingly lenient response to many child molesters. Those trends continue into the present, where there are pockets of overreaction to sexual abuse in a sea of under-reaction….

This powerful book shows how a narrative based on empirically thin evidence became a theory with real social force, and how that theory stood at odds with the grim reality of sexual abuse. The Witch-Hunt Narrative is a magisterial account of the social dynamics that led to the denial of widespread human tragedy.
http://blogs.brown.edu/rcheit/sample-page-2/
http://blogs.brown.edu/rcheit/

‘The Witch-Hunt Narrative’: Are We Dismissing Real Victims?, Suspected devil worshipper accused of killing woman, Survivorship Movie

June 11, 2014 Comments Off on ‘The Witch-Hunt Narrative’: Are We Dismissing Real Victims?, Suspected devil worshipper accused of killing woman, Survivorship Movie

– ‘The Witch-Hunt Narrative’: Are We Dismissing Real Victims?
“the continued treatment of these cases as a modern-day episode of mass hysteria does disservice to children and even puts them in danger”

– Survivorship Movie (the Survivorship edit)

– Suspected devil worshipper accused of killing woman
“owner caught him using animal parts to perform a satanic ritual”

Abuse Cases, and a Legacy of Skepticism
‘The Witch-Hunt Narrative’: Are We Dismissing Real Victims?

JUNE 9, 2014

….McMartin was the first of a series of prosecutions in the 1980s that have come to be seen as a collective witch hunt, in which panicked parents and incompetent investigators led children to make up stories of abuse by adults at day care centers and preschools.

At first, the news media ran with the lurid accounts of abuse, but then some skeptical reporters questioned the prevailing narrative and discredited the snowballing allegations. The pendulum swung from credulity to doubt.

But what if the skeptics went too far? What if some of the children were really abused? And what if the legacy of these cases is a disturbing tendency to disbelieve children who say they are being molested?

Those are the questions that frame this new book by Ross E. Cheit, a political scientist at Brown University who spent nearly 15 years on research, poring over old trial transcripts and interview tapes.

His conclusion about the McMartin case is that the outcome was “doubly unjust.” While he acknowledges that some defendants were falsely accused, he argues that Mr. Buckey was probably guilty, meaning that some of the children were not only sexually abused but “have been demeaned by the witch-hunt narrative’s assertion that the entire case was a ‘hoax.’ ”

It’s a provocative notion, that the debunkers deserve a debunking. Professor Cheit, who himself suffered sexual abuse as a child, criticizes the skepticism that helped bring down the prosecutions of McMartin and other day-care providers, calling it a “crusade to promote the witch-hunt narrative.”

He thinks the continued treatment of these cases as a modern-day episode of mass hysteria does disservice to children and even puts them in danger….

Most children who are sexually abused do not tell anyone. “Perpetrators often choose children on the basis of the likelihood that they will comply and keep the secret,” Dr. Lyon writes.

It’s a pattern that played out in the years of hidden sexual abuse by Catholic priests, and at Penn State by the coach Jerry Sandusky.

Professor Cheit is rightly haunted by the cover-up at Penn State. “We often minimize and deny so as to allow us to avoid seeing things we would rather not see,” he writes….
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/science/the-witch-hunt-narrative-are-we-dismissing-real-victims.html

Survivorship Movie (the Survivorship edit) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BONGdkCuSiw

Survivorship – For survivors of ritual abuse, mind control and torture and pro-survivors https://www.survivorship.org

Suspected devil worshipper accused of killing woman and eating part of her corpse
Jun 10, 2014 By Christopher Bucktin

Gregory Hale, has been arrested at his home in Coffee County, Tennessee, and is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and abuse of a corpse

A suspected devil worshipper has been accused of killing a woman, dismembering her body and eating part of her corpse, authorities said.

Gregory Hale, has been arrested at his home in Coffee County, Tennessee, and is charged with premeditated first-degree murder and abuse of a corpse….

He is reported to have admitted killing Hyder and then disposing of the body by chopping it up.

Hale buried the victim’s body but ate part of the corpse, court documentation stated.

A friend of Hale’s said he a self-described devil worshipper who was fired from a slaughterhouse after the owner caught him performing a satanic ritual with animal parts….
http://www.irishmirror.ie/news/suspected-devil-worshipper-accused-killing-3672033

Tennessee man kills woman, eats corpse: US officials
Wednesday Jun 11, 2014

A man in Tennessee has been arrested after local police discovered a woman’s partially-eaten corpse in his rural home.

37-year-old Gregory Scott Hale is charged with first-degree murder and abuse of a corpse in connection with the death of Lisa Marie Hyder….

Local NBC affiliate WSMV reports that neighbors say Dale described himself as a devil worshipper, and he was fired from his job at a slaughterhouse when the owner caught him using animal parts to perform a satanic ritual.

His is being held on $1.5 million bond and will next appear in court June 23.UPI
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2014/06/10/366414/tennessee-man-kills-woman-eats-corpse/

 

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