Donald Trump Rape Accuser Drops Suit, Janet Reno Frank Fuster County Walk Case, Appco Workers

November 8, 2016 Comments Off on Donald Trump Rape Accuser Drops Suit, Janet Reno Frank Fuster County Walk Case, Appco Workers

– Jane Doe Who Accused Trump of Raping Her When She Was 13 Drops Her Suit
– NIGHTMARE IN COUNTRY WALK
– What Beck Left Out
– Debunking Frontline’s – Did Daddy Do It? “”Frank Fuster was living the American dream.” Or so claims Frontline
– Appco: Workers allegedly forced to ‘shove cigarettes up bottoms’ after missing sales targets


Quotes on the County Walk Frank Fuster Case (sources below):


The Fuster case originated with a child spontaneously talking about being abused. That clear statement caused two families to withdraw their children from Fuster’s home daycare, which they did without informing anyone else. Months later, a spontaneous statement from a different child, started an investigation by law enforcement. An articulate 5-year-old boy was soon located, who gave several detailed statements that were later corroborated in various ways.”


“When the charges emerged in the home daycare case, Frank Fuster was on parole for sexually assaulting a 9-year-old two years earlier….the fact is that Fuster admitted in his parole violation hearing on the 1984 charges that, in the course of driving the girl home, he made her sit on his lap and he touched “her chest area” and “her vagina area.”


“Beck makes a point of saying that, despite claims about games involving feces, the police were “unable to find” any “feces smeared across the walls of the Fuster home” (p. 141). But he does not inform his readers that the police found a photo of precisely that: Frank’s son in a room smeared with feces on the floor and wall.”


“Beck acknowledges Frank Fuster’s 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a minor, but he quickly adds, without any apparent skepticism, that “Frank had always maintained his innocence.” (p. 142). But Beck does not tell his readers that Fuster actually admitted the actions charged in that case, and then tried to minimize them, while testifying at his Parole Violation Hearing three years later (Cheit, p. 337).”


“But Frank Fuster was not living the American dream. He was on probation for a 1982 child molestation conviction for a lewd and lascivious assault on an nine-year-old girl. Fuster also served four years in New York for manslaughter, after shooting a man in after a traffic accident and then threatening an off-duty policeman with his loaded rifle. His “new wife” was also his third wife, a girl barely sixteen years old whose status as an immigrant was unsure…And he gained custody of his son after threatening his ex-wife’s life if she contested the matter.”


“The things that Martha Fuster is willing to admit in this deposition are haunting, partly for the similarities to Ileana’s situation. Frank met Martha when she was sixteen; she lost her virginity and felt forced to marry Frank. Ileana confessed something similar to Shirley Blando and others at the prison, months before the psychologists were hired by her lawyer. And she used the word rape. (Blando deposition, State v. Fuster, August 1, 1985; tr. 78). Martha Fuster was kicked out of her house after Frank beat up her father (Martha Gonzalez Fuster Deposition tr., 13). Ileana’s mother remarried – and her new husband, Isreal Mendosa, called the police when Frank Fuster pulled a gun on him during an argument.”


“Also during this time, the police were called when Frank Fuster, in the heat of an argument, pulled a gun on Ileana’s step-father. In the year before the Country Walk case broke, Frank Fuster hit Ileana in the face repeatedly in front of other people at a Halloween party after she mentioned that he owned a gun.”


“In his own testimony in the Country Walk trial, Frank Fuster told so many lies that his lawyer was forced to admit as much to the jury in closing arguments. His most outrageous lie was one he maintained throughout the case: that he did not run a day care operation and that there was no Country Walk babysitting service. He also said “there were only a few children.”


Jane Doe Who Accused Trump of Raping Her When She Was 13 Drops Her Suit
By Dave Quinn and Diane Herbst November 5, 2016


The anonymous California woman who accused Donald Trump in a federal lawsuit of raping her in the ’90s when she was 13 has voluntarily dismissed her lawsuit, her attorney said late Friday….  Doe had accused the Republican presidential nominee of raping her during the summer of 1994, allegedly in the home of Jeffrey Epstein — a businessman and convicted sex offender also named in the lawsuit.  “Jane Doe instructed us to dismiss her lawsuit against Trump and Epstein today,” Bloom wrote….
  http://people.com/politics/donald-trump-rape-lawsuit-dismissed/


NIGHTMARE IN COUNTRY WALK
BY GLENN COLLINS December 14, 1986


UNSPEAKABLE ACTS By Jan Hollingsworth. Illustrated. 592 pp. New York: Congdon & Weed. $18.95.


OF Susan, a parent who suspects that her child has been sexually abused, ”Unspeakable Acts” tells us: ”Susan said she couldn’t rest until she knew the truth. She wouldn’t rest afterward, either.” Readers of Jan Hollingsworth’s account of a widely publicized Florida child-abuse case may feel the same. In its lurid details, its frustrating complexity and in the agony of the children and families who were victimized, this case would seem to be the paradigm of incidents in Minnesota, California and elsewhere that have surfaced in recent years. A startling difference, though, is the outcome: the molester was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.


Indeed, after reading Ms. Hollingsworth’s description of the trial, it seems almost a miracle that, in October 1985, the owner of the Country Walk Babysitting Service, one Frank Fuster, was found guilty of 14 counts of abuse. ”It was an almost perfect crime,” Ms. Hollingsworth comments, and this could be said of child sexual abuse in general, since it is usually committed in the absence of witnesses or corroboration other than the testimony of the small victims.


Mr. Fuster was convicted of molesting the children entrusted to his wife’s care in their home in the middle-class Dade County suburb of Country Walk, a planned development that was intended to be an idyllic refuge from the anxieties of urban Miami.


Of course, given the media coverage, the triumph of the Fuster prosecution was a consuming matter for Dade County residents. But the importance of the case transcends Floridians’ concerns. This book is almost a primer for parents, criminal justice personnel and social service workers in the do’s and don’ts of attempting to prevent, and make prosecutable, ”the most unprosecutable crime in the nation,” as the book describes it.


….Her presentation of the case includes trial testimony and the verbatim reports of psychiatrists and polygraph operators, and it may be too thorough for some readers’ taste. But it has a mesmerizing quality that makes this book as compelling as it is heartrending.


Readers are likely to recoil from accounts of Mr. Fuster’s actions. It is sickening stuff. But such details account for both the public attention accorded the case and the outrage that animated parents and prosecutors alike – indignation that led to Mr. Fuster’s life sentence. Mr. Fuster’s unspeakable acts were more than just the repeated sexual abuse of children; the victims also testified that he led them in satanic rituals in which both crucifixes and excrement played a part. Some of the children’s most disturbing testimony involved descriptions of the ways in which he terrorized them: one method was to force them to watch him mutilate pet birds, an object lesson to tots who might disclose the abuse. THE author cites the specifics of these revolting rituals to illustrate disturbing similarities in some of the multiple-victim sexual-abuse cases that have recently been discovered in other states. She suggests that such acts are fostered by a nationwide network of pedophiles who swap information and videotapes in a mega-dollar child-pornography business the F.B.I. would do well to target….

http://www.nytimes.com/1986/12/14/books/nightmare-in-country-walk.html


Mythical Numbers and Satanic Ritual Abuse

Sep 10, 2014  Ross Cheit Professor at Brown University


The Fuster case originated with a child spontaneously talking about being abused. That clear statement caused two families to withdraw their children from Fuster’s home daycare, which they did without informing anyone else. Months later, a spontaneous statement from a different child, started an investigation by law enforcement. An articulate 5-year-old boy was soon located, who gave several detailed statements that were later corroborated in various ways. The case was tagged by some as “satanic ritual abuse” because children made statements about Fuster wearing masks, killing a bird and playing with feces. Those allegations quietly disappeared from the witch-hunt narrative when adult testimony and photographic evidence corroborated these statements. But the satanic tag lived on. The leading academic psychologists on child suggestibility still claim that the case was filled with “fantastic” elements like “riding a shark.” But the only child who said anything close to that was describing a Jacques Cousteau program. Hardly a matter of satanic ritual abuse.


When the charges emerged in the home daycare case, Frank Fuster was on parole for sexually assaulting a 9-year-old two years earlier. The jury that convicted Fuster in 1985 was unaware of this prior conviction. But others who have embraced Frank Fuster as innocent know about it and claim that lighting struck twice — Fuster was innocent the first time, too. But the fact is that Fuster admitted in his parole violation hearing on the 1984 charges that, in the course of driving the girl home, he made her sit on his lap and he touched “her chest area” and “her vagina area.”….

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ross-cheit/mythical-numbers-and-sata_b_5578078.html


What Beck Left Out


August 8, 2015


The witch-hunt narrative, as described in my book, has deep roots in American culture. It ranges from Salem Massachusetts to the McCarthy hearings of the 1950s. The power of those cautionary tales, however, causes many people to drop their skeptical guard when told that something is a modern day witch-hunt. So it is with the conventional wisdom about the highly publicized day-care sexual abuse cases from the 1980s.


Richard Beck, a comparative literature major from Harvard who works at a literary magazine, is the latest one spreading the witch-hunt narrative about those cases. His book, We Believe the Children, based largely on secondary sources, reaches the same conclusions that Debbie Nathan and defense lawyer Michael Snedeker offered twenty years ago. In both instances, the authors repeatedly omitted significant evidence that contradicts the witch-hunt narrative. Consider some examples of what Beck left out:….


Beck makes a point of saying that, despite claims about games involving feces, the police were “unable to find” any “feces smeared across the walls of the Fuster home” (p. 141). But he does not inform his readers that the police found a photo of precisely that: Frank’s son in a room smeared with feces on the floor and wall. Beck also omits any mention that Debbie Nathan, his primary source for the book, once acknowledged that it “appears that [Frank Fuster] perpetrated sadomasochistic assaults against [Ileana, his wife] (who was legally a minor) and possibly against the younger children, including abuse involving urine and excrement” (Cheit, p. 327, fn. 125). When characterizing the case as “satanic ritual abuse,” Beck does not acknowledge that evidence, but he mentions that there were allegations involving masks (pp. xiii). But Beck omits the fact that masks were found in Fuster’s house and that adults testified in the case about being scared by Frank Fuster using them (Cheit, pp. 297-98, 331).


Beck repeats the claim that Ileana Fuster was held naked in an isolation cell in the Country Walk case (p. 143). But he does not acknowledge that Ileana Fuster made no such claim in the actual motion she brought concerning her treatment in prison, while being held. In that motion, alleging “cruel and unusual punishment,” Ileana Fuster complained of things like having “only limited access to shower facilities” and “only limited access to hot water for coffee.” There was nothing in her motion about being held nude (Cheit, p. 333). Beck also neglects to inform his readers that Ileana Fuster denied that she had been held naked when asked about it years later, by defense lawyer Arthur Cohen, in an interview that Beck cites elsewhere with approval (Cheit, p. 335).


Beck acknowledges Frank Fuster’s 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a minor, but he quickly adds, without any apparent skepticism, that “Frank had always maintained his innocence.” (p. 142). But Beck does not tell his readers that Fuster actually admitted the actions charged in that case, and then tried to minimize them, while testifying at his Parole Violation Hearing three years later (Cheit, p. 337). Here is how Fuster explained what he did to a 9-year-old while driving her home one night:


This is how I touch her chest area. I don’t see any sexual movement here. I also touch her in the vaginal area. That’s it. That’s the whole case.


Nor does Beck acknowledge Frank Fuster’s long record of documented lies about his manslaughter conviction. As I said in The Witch-Hunt Narrative: “one wonders how anyone could cite his denials with utter credulity and without any acknowledgment of the considerable evidence to the contrary” (Cheit, p. 338).


Beck also impugns the most important child in the Fuster case without acknowledging that he never examined the first interview with that child, an interview that played a major role in the case. Psychology professor James Wood recently admitted that he and Debbie Nathan, his co-author for a forthcoming commentary on my book, never examined this interview, which Wood described as “key for understanding the case” (Wood, personal communication; July 18, 2015)….


In many of the cases proclaimed to be witch hunts, looking closely at the record revealed substantial evidence of abuse and compelling reasons that jurors voted to convict. It’s true that I also found cases where people were charged who shouldn’t have been. Yet even in some of those cases, there was strong evidence of abuse. A crime was committed and a child was assaulted by someone who was never apprehended, but only the false accusation story lives on….

http://blogs.brown.edu/rcheit/2015/08/08/what-beck-left-out/


Debunking Frontline’s – Did Daddy Do It? “”Frank Fuster was living the American dream.” Or so claims Frontline
…for the 4/25/02 program, “Did Daddy Do It?” Fuster had “a new house in the suburbs, a successful landscaping business, and a new wife.” Then, according to the highly-acclaimed PBS program, Fuster “found himself” charged with sexually abusing children in their home day care. His subsequent conviction, considered ironclad by many, was the target of this hour-long program. But Frank Fuster was not living the American dream. He was on probation for a 1982 child molestation conviction for a lewd and lascivious assault on an nine-year-old girl. Fuster also served four years in New York for manslaughter, after shooting a man in after a traffic accident and then threatening an off-duty policeman with his loaded rifle. His “new wife” was also his third wife, a girl barely sixteen years old whose status as an immigrant was unsure…And he gained custody of his son after threatening his ex-wife’s life if she contested the matter.”
https://web.archive.org/web/20070404174438/http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Taubman_Center/PBS/


Frank Fuster gained custody of his son after threatening his ex-wife’s life if she contested the matter


Source: State v. Escalona [Fuster], Case No. 84-19728, Deposition of Martha Gonzales Fuster (August 8, 1985), tr. 58-60 (“he told me that he would kill me,” “if I ever took Noel away,” “he would kill me if I took Noel,” “afraid of him.”)


The things that Martha Fuster is willing to admit in this deposition are haunting, partly for the similarities to Ileana’s situation. Frank met Martha when she was sixteen; she lost her virginity and felt forced to marry Frank. Ileana confessed something similar to Shirley Blando and others at the prison, months before the psychologists were hired by her lawyer. And she used the word rape. (Blando deposition, State v. Fuster, August 1, 1985; tr. 78). Martha Fuster was kicked out of her house after Frank beat up her father (Martha Gonzalez Fuster Deposition tr., 13). Ileana’s mother remarried – and her new husband, Isreal Mendosa, called the police when Frank Fuster pulled a gun on him during an argument.


Further contradicting the “American Dream” image painted by Frontline, Fuster has acknowledged (and Jan Hollingsworth reported) that he was the subject of a criminal complaint for rape 1980.


Fuster was also the victim of a close-range gunshot to the face in 1980. The authorities were told it was a robbery; but nothing was stolen and the act appeared to be personal. The authorities speculated that it was an act of revenge. Also during this time, the police were called when Frank Fuster, in the heat of an argument, pulled a gun on Ileana’s step-father. In the year before the Country Walk case broke, Frank Fuster hit Ileana in the face repeatedly in front of other people at a Halloween party after she mentioned that he owned a gun.


Having a gun was a violation of Frank Fuster’s parole conditions—for his 1982 conviction for lewd and lascivious assault on a nine-year-old girl….


Frank Fuster’s documented history of deception about this case


In his own testimony in the Country Walk trial, Frank Fuster told so many lies that his lawyer was forced to admit as much to the jury in closing arguments. His most outrageous lie was one he maintained throughout the case: that he did not run a day care operation and that there was no Country Walk babysitting service. He also said “there were only a few children.” Then in an impromptu press conference while the jury was out, Fuster argued “she babysat 50 kids and they only had seven here, how come”? (The answer, of course, is that many children were too young to testify, others did not want to, and other’s were not thought to have been abused by the Fusters.)


Fuster also lied to his lawyer. Exasperated, he told the judge that he was tired of “only getting abuse” from Fuster. (Magistrate’s Report, p. 25) Later, he used his lawyer’s conclusion that he was “an unmitigated liar” as one of his alleged grounds from appeal! (Magistrate’s Report, p. 113) Fuster eventually lied to the judge about why his own lawyer wanted out of the case. The judge called him on this lie….

https://web.archive.org/web/20070206102956/http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Taubman_Center/PBS/intro.html#3


Appco: Workers allegedly forced to ‘shove cigarettes up bottoms’ after missing sales targets

By the National Reporting Team’s Lorna Knowles and Elise Worthington


Young charity workers were forced to lick underwear, cross dress and take part in obscene cigarette rituals, according to lawyers suing the marketing giant Appco.


The shocking allegations are the latest to emerge as part of an $85 million class action against the Appco Group in the Federal Court of Australia.


The Appco Group is one of the world’s biggest fundraising agencies and rattles the tin on behalf of some of Australia’s best known charities, including Surf Life Saving Australia and The Starlight Foundation.


But its workers, sometimes known as “charity muggers” or “chuggers”, claim they were overworked, grossly underpaid and bullied.


Lawyer Rory Markham told the ABC more than 500 former workers had come forward since he filed the class action against the Appco Group last month.


Mr Markham said some alleged that they were forced to cross dress, take part in “cockfights” and lick underpants if they did not meet their daily sales targets.


Workers in Tasmania also allege they were forced to participate in an obscene ritual involving cigarettes….

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-05/fresh-allegations-of-bizarre-rituals-at-marketing-giant-appco/7996710 

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