WI lawmakers look to pass “Caylee’s Law”, Trauma and Dissociation in China

August 1, 2011 Comments Off on WI lawmakers look to pass “Caylee’s Law”, Trauma and Dissociation in China

“There is virtually no popular or professional knowledge of dissociative identity disorder in China, and therefore professional and popular contamination cannot exist.”

“Dissociative disorders were diagnosed in 24 respondents by structured interview, and 15 respondents fell into the dissociative taxon on the Dissociative Experiences Scale.”

Trauma and Dissociation in China

Am J Psychiatry 163:1388-1391, August 2006
doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.163.8.1388
2006 American Psychiatric Association

OBJECTIVE: In order to determine whether pathological dissociation occurs in China, the authors conducted a survey among psychiatric inpatients, outpatients, and the general population in Shanghai, China. There is virtually no popular or professional knowledge of dissociative identity disorder in China, and therefore professional and popular contamination cannot exist.

METHOD: Chinese versions of the Dissociative Experiences Scale and the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule were administered to 423 inpatients, 304 outpatients, and 618 factory workers in Shanghai by Chinese psychiatrists working at the Shanghai Mental Health Center.

RESULTS: Dissociative disorders were diagnosed in 24 respondents by structured interview, and 15 respondents fell into the dissociative taxon on the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The outpatients reported the highest rates of childhood physical and/or sexual abuse and of pathological dissociation.

ONCLUSIONS: Pathological dissociation can be detected readily among psychiatric outpatients in China but is much less common in the general population. Pathological dissociation is more frequent in more traumatized subsamples of the Chinese population. The findings are not consistent with the sociocognitive, contamination, or iatrogenic models of dissociative identity disorder.
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/163/8/1388

Trauma and Dissociation in China
Zeping Xiao, M.D., Heqin Yan, Zhen Wang, M.D., Zheng Zou, M.D., Yong Xu, M.D., Jue Chen, M.D., Haiyin Zhang, M.D., Colin A. Ross, M.D., and Benjamin B. Keyes, Ph.D.
Am J Psychiatry 163:1388-1391, August 2006
doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.163.8.1388
2006 American Psychiatric Association

quotes:
“China is a country in which there is little public or cultural
awareness of dissociative identity disorder or other forms of chronic, complex, pathological dissociation. We are not familiar with any representation of the disorder on television, in film, in novels or plays, or in popular folklore. The trauma model of dissociation is not taught at medical schools in China, and dissociative disorders are very rarely
diagnosed by mental health professionals. China, therefore, is virtually free of cultural or professional contamination concerning dissociative disorders.”

“The results of our study support the epidemiological
prediction of the trauma model of dissociation and are not
consistent with the sociocognitive model. Pathological dissociation was reported by Chinese respondents, despite the lack of contamination, role demands, and iatrogenic suggestion in China.”

“As shown in Table 1, there are hints in the secondary features of dissociative identity disorder that full or partial
forms of dissociative identity disorder could affect more
than 2.3% of the Chinese outpatient sample (the sum of
the frequencies of these two diagnoses on the Dissociative
Disorders Interview Schedule). For instance, 3.6% of the Chinese outpatients said that they have another person
inside of them.

The outpatients reported more childhood trauma than
the other two groups. The outpatients had more dissociative
disorders on the Dissociative Disorders Interview
Schedule, more members of the dissociative taxon on the
Dissociative Experiences Scale, higher average scores on
the Dissociative Experiences Scale, and more secondary
features of dissociative identity disorder on the Dissociative
Disorders Interview Schedule. Thus, the outpatients
were more dissociative than the other two groups on four
different ways of assessing dissociation. The fact that they
also reported more childhood abuse is consistent with the
trauma model of pathological dissociation.”

“China provides an example of a culture largely uncontaminated by popular or professional
knowledge of dissociative identity disorder and therefore
is suitable for testing the epidemiological predictions of
the trauma and sociocognitive models.”

full text at http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/reprint/163/8/1388.pdf

WI lawmakers look to pass “Caylee’s Law”
Jul 31, 2011  By Megan Wiebold

Eau Claire (WQOW) – After the acquittal of Casey Anthony in the death of her daughter, Caylee, many lawmakers clamored to create a law that would punish  parents for failing to alert police when their son or daughter is missing. Wisconsin is just one of nearly two dozen states that are looking into creating a measure that would be called “Caylee’s Law”.

2-year-old Caylee Anthony had been missing for 31 days before police knew about her disappearance. Wisconsin lawmakers say they’ve gotten hundreds of e-mails and phone calls about creating a law to punish parents who do not report their child missing.

….There are currently no laws in Wisconsin that punish parents for failing to report a missing child. Lawmakers say it’s an issue that’s been discussed for years.
….Currently, there are two versions of the law being drafted.

http://www.wqow.com/story/15182706/wi-lawmakers-look-to-pass-caylees-law

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