Pa. mother sentenced in NJ for religious ritual

June 29, 2011 Comments Off on Pa. mother sentenced in NJ for religious ritual

Pa. mother sentenced in NJ for religious ritual Jun 25, 2011
HACKENSACK, N.J. (AP) — A Pennsylvania woman who made her daughter observe a bloody religious ritual in New Jersey has been sentenced to 18 months probation. Yenitza Colichon of Jamesburg pleaded guilty last month to child neglect and cruelty charges stemming from the May 2007 incident, in which she made her 7-year-old daughter watch an initiation rite in Paterson….

Passaic County prosecutors say Colichon was about to start Army basic training and wanted to protect her daughter in the Palo Mayombe religion before she left. The religion originated in central Africa.

The girl later told a teacher that she was having nightmares and child welfare officials were contacted.
http://www.necn.com/06/25/11/Pa-mother-sentenced-in-NJ-for-religious-/landing_nation.html?&blockID=3&apID=2af86dbdd8864f2ca0ffce1723d90e9b

Mother pleads guilty over Paterson bloody religious ritual
Monday, May 23, 2011  BY JOHN PETRICK STAFF WRITER The Record

A mother who exposed her 7-year-old daughter to bloody religious initiation rituals in Paterson that included making her watch a chicken being sacrificed and feeding the girl its heart pleaded guilty in state court Monday to cruelty and neglect of a child. A Paterson couple who were practitioners of the Palo Mayombe religion and who the mother asked to perform the ritual also were accepted into pre-trial intervention Monday for one year.

….Dolls, a shrine, religious statues, bones, machetes and bundles of sticks bearing numbers and names were among artifacts found at the home. The items, some of which had blood and animal hair on them, matched a description the girl gave about what she saw at the home.

….In addition to being fed the chicken’s heart, the rituals included making the girl witness the decapitation of a goat, and the scratching of a religious symbol into her skin.
http://www.northjersey.com/news/crime_courts/052311_Mother_pleads_guilty_over_bloody_religious_ritual.html

describes rituals
What Price Religious “Freedom”? May 28, 2011 By Janet Heimlich

The state of Oregon stands poised to end a dangerous practice. If a bill that has passed both the House and Senate becomes law, parents who allow their sick children to die after refusing them medical care on religious grounds would no longer be granted prosecutorial immunity. Passing this bill sends an important message: Parents who harm their children for religious reasons should be punished just as severely as parents who harm their children when religion is not a factor.

Unfortunately, however, legislators and the courts still frequently maintain a double standard when it comes to deciding the fates of abusive and neglectful parents, depending on whether harm is perpetrated in the name of faith. For example, if a woman neglects to feed her child because she is strung out on drugs, she will likely be prosecuted. But if that denial happens as part of a religious fast, the law usually has no problem with it….
http://religiouschildmaltreatment.com/2011/05/what-price-religious-freedom/

Oregon Senate against spiritual defense for murder
TAMI ABDOLLAH, Associated Press  May 23, 2011
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Senate voted Monday to drop faith healing as a legal defense to murder after repeated deaths of children in a local church community.
The Senate voted 25-5 to approve the measure. It was drafted largely in response to the 2008 deaths of children among members of the Followers of Christ Church in Oregon City, who rely on spiritual treatments instead of medical care.

“The bottom line is that children in Oregon ought to be seeing the kind of health care they need to live, thrive and survive,” said Republican Sen. Bruce Starr of Hillsboro, who sponsored the bill.

Under the measure, prosecutors can seek first-degree manslaughter or murder charges against parents whose children died because they were treated solely with faith.
http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/Ore-Senate-against-spiritual-defense-for-murder-1391974.php

New Evidence in the Catholic Priest Sex Abuse Scandal – BBC and Los Angeles

June 28, 2011 Comments Off on New Evidence in the Catholic Priest Sex Abuse Scandal – BBC and Los Angeles

Dan Rather Reports – All Is Not Forgiven – An investigation of shocking new evidence in the Catholic priest sex abuse scandal in Los Angeles.
http://www.hd.net/programs/danrather/

He was my priest and my friend. Then I found out he was a paedophile

– How the scandal of Father Kit Cunningham has made Peter Stanford question his church and his faith
Peter Stanford The Observer, Sunday 19 June 2011

….In Abused: Breaking the Silence, a documentary to be shown on BBC1 on Tuesday, reporter Olenka Frenkiel hears from other former pupils at Soni about how they were subjected to a regime of sexual abuse from which they were powerless to escape.

….There have also been repeated public expressions of regret by the Catholic authorities as these scandals have emerged all round the globe, revealing this as an endemic problem in the church rather than, as Pope John Paul II originally suggested in 2002, a case of a few bad apples.

….Abused: Breaking The Silence is on BBC1 on Tuesday at 21 June, 10.35pm
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/belief/2011/jun/19/kit-cunningham-child-abuse

Ritual Abuse and Child Abuse Conference – August 2011

June 26, 2011 Comments Off on Ritual Abuse and Child Abuse Conference – August 2011

copied with permission

The 14th Annual Ritual Abuse,
Secretive Organizations and Mind Control Conference

August 5 – 7, 2011

DoubleTree near Bradley International Airport
16 Ella Grasso Turnpike
Windsor Locks, CT

Sponsored by: S.M.A.R.T.

Promotional Cosponsors:
Survivorship
California Protective Parents Association
Persons Against Ritual Abuse-Torture

Internet conference information:
http://ritualabuse.us/smart-conference/

The 14th Annual Ritual Abuse,
Secretive Organizations and Mind Control Conference

Conference Goals
– To help stop future occurrences of ritual  abuse
– To help survivors of ritual abuse
– To name the groups that have participated  in   alleged  illegal  activities
– To unite those working to stop ritual  abuse

Speakers and Biographies
(This is a partial listing. Please check our conference home page for our latest speaker list and schedule.)
Please note: Listing of these speakers does not necessarily constitute our endorsement of them. They are speaking at our conference for educational  value  only and some may be heavy for survivors.  Listening to the speakers at the conference may or may not help your recovery process, so use caution when listening to any speaker or contacting any resource mentioned in this brochure.

These descriptions may be heavy for survivors to read.  Please use caution while reading.

Neil Brick  is a survivor of Masonic based Ritual Abuse and MK-ULTRA. He is the editor of S.M.A.R.T. – A Ritual Abuse Newsletter. His topic is:
Always Getting Stronger: Giving Survivors a Voice in the World.

Carmen Yana Holiday is a survivor of  child pornography, human trafficking,  ritual abuse-torture and mind control. She has been an advocate for other survivors since 2001, developing and facilitating trauma recovery workshops and presenting as a survivor of RA-MC for several organizations. Her topic is: The Official Story vs. Reality: Survivors of Extreme Abuse as Whistleblowers.

deJoly LaBrier has been doing recovery work for 22 yrs. She has spoken publicly about her experiences in a military sex ring, Satanic cult and government experimentation; and is grateful for the serenity and sanity she now experiences.  Her topic is: The Challenges of Recovering From Extreme Abuse

Janet Thomas is an author, teacher and activist. Her books include, “Day Breaks Over Dharamsala,” a memoir of healing from ritual abuse, mind control, medical experimentation and sexual exploitation, and “The Battle in Seattle – The Story Behind and Beyond the WTO Demonstrations,” an exploration of the socio-political-cultural issues that shape our times. Her topic is: Writing Out Loud—The Power of Story to Save Our Lives and Change the World

Kristin Constance has a Diploma in Community Welfare and Professional Counselling. She works with people with disabilities some who have been abused severely. She is a survivor of alleged masonic and order of the eastern star ritual abuse within a multi-generational family. She has been healing for twenty years.  Her topic is: Alleged ritual abuse by freemasons and order of the eastern star (co-freemasonry) in Australia.

Mary Keats RN BA wife, mother working in social services, is a survivor of Ritual Abuse Torture.  She is a spiritual person who enjoys life to the fullest. Her energy and enthusiasm are infectious. She refuses to be muzzled, decided early on in her recovery to break the silence, so others could be helped. Her topic is: Continuing Hope and Healing

Maria’s success and joy emerged from her innate creativity to survive her childhood. For the first seven years of Maria’s life she was subject to sadistic abuse and child pornography and also ongoing incest  from infancy until age of eighteen. She lives well through consistency in healing and self-awareness. Her topic is: Why I never married

Dave was satanically abused for over 50 years by his family, their friends, and others who were paid to harm him for his refusal as a child to join their cult. Dave is a retired business man who hopes the telling of his story will help others.

Conference Schedule
There will be a small get together, deli dinner, dessert  and early registration for pre-registered attendees only, on August 6, Friday  evening. Please check our conference home page for the latest conference schedule information. Some presentations will also be recorded.

 

Conference Registration

(Please read the entire brochure before registering.)
Registration is not guaranteed, please wait for approval before making travel arrangements.
Or you can preregister via E-mail: SMARTNEWS@aol.com

Please mail registration form and checks (US Banks only please), money orders (US) to: RA Conference, c/o S.M.A.R.T., P O Box 1295, Easthampton, MA 01027 USA

Name: (please include names and individual addresses of all registrees, thanks.)
___________________________

Agency: ___________________________________

Street: ____________________________

City: ___________________State:______

Zip:________E-mail_________________

Fees  Early registration fees (all fees are per person)
(note: fees must be received by the due date below to get the special prices)

One and two day registrations do not include the Friday deli dinner and dessert buffet.

Before 7/8/11- 2 day $185, one day $95
Before 8/1/11 – 2 day $205, one day $105
After 8/1/11 – 2 day $215, one day $110

(Circle one – Sat – Sun for one day registrations)
_______________________

To add Friday night early registration, get together, deli dinner and dessert  – $37.00

Donation to help those on fee waiver (not tax deductible):

_____________

Total Amount Due          _____________

special meals needed ____________________

Please make checks payable to S.M.A.R.T.
(US banks only, please.) Refund Policy: Fees will not be refunded after July 7, 2011. Please send us written notice. Refund will be minus $70.00 deposit per registree.

Conference Information

Conference Participants
The conference will include all those either recovering from ritual abuse and/or fighting against ritual abuse. This includes survivors, co-survivors, therapists, other helping professionals, lawyers and all others interested in learning more about ritual abuse.
Members of secret organizations, acting out  perpetrators, and/or members of unsympathetic organizations are excluded from the conference. This is for the protection and safety of those in attendance.
People have told us that last year’s conference  was the safest conference they have ever been to. But, this conference may not necessarily be safe for all survivors. S.M.A.R.T. recommends that you try to bring a support person that is familiar with mind control techniques and staying with that person or another safe person at all times.

Registration Waivers
Fee waiver application fees are $95.00 for two days and $50 for one day, and are non-refundable. Please do not send fees until your application is accepted. Please add $30 to attend the Friday night early registration, get together and dessert buffet. Applications will not be accepted after July 1, 2011, payment must be made by 7/14/11. Acceptance will partially be contingent on the number of paid applicants. Fee waiver registrees must volunteer for four hours at the conference. Unfortunately, we cannot afford to pay any travel expenses. Please E-mail or regular mail us for an application.

Transportation
There is a free shuttle to and from the airport. Hotel parking is available at no charge for those attending the conference. Conference sponsors, etc. assume no responsibility for ground and/or air transportation arrangements. Conference sponsors cannot assume responsibility  for additional expense or losses due to illnesses, cancellation of flights, strikes or other causes.

Accommodations
Room rates at the DoubleTree Hotel at Bradley International Airport (CT) are $89 a day for one person (not incl. tax), please mention the SMART 2011 conference to get the special rate. This rate is guaranteed until 7/7/11 or all rooms at the special rate are gone. Call 860-627-5171 for information. Lunch will be free both days for all conference attendees that register before August 1, 2011. The hotel has no information about the conference, other than room information.

Attendance Policy
Survivors should try to bring a support person with them to the conference. Presentation of a picture ID will be required of all  conference participants, unless prior arrangements are made. This is for the protection of all participants. Some of the topics discussed may  be very heavy for survivors. The conference is educational and not intended as therapy or treatment. Conference sponsors, cosponsor, speakers, organizers and exhibitors assume no responsibility for any reactions resulting from attending our conference. Statements made and materials exhibited and distributed by attendees, speakers and exhibitors are their  own and don’t necessarily  represent the policies or views of conference sponsors, cosponsor, speakers, exhibitors, organizers or attendees. Children are not permitted to attend the conference. S.M.A.R.T. and its representatives also reserve the right to remove anyone from the conference at any time. Photographing, audio taping and videotaping without written permission from S.M.A.R.T. are prohibited.

Exhibitors
Tables and half tables will be available for exhibitors. All exhibitors and their materials, etc. must be pre-approved. Write for more information. Whole tables are $25, half tables are $15. Take one table fee is $5.00 per item.

Volunteers
S.M.A.R.T. is currently looking for volunteers to help  at the conference. Please let  S.M.A.R.T. know if you are interested.

Conference Donations
Please consider sponsoring a full or partial registree, so that all are able to attend the conference. Thank you.  (Donations are not tax deductible.)

Sponsorship  and Co-sponsorship Information

All sponsors and cosponsors have made promotional contributions to the conference. We want to thank them for all their efforts.

Please note: Listing of these resource organizations does not necessarily constitute our endorsement of them. They are helping to promote the  conference and some may be heavy for some survivors, so use caution  contacting any resource mentioned in this brochure.

The conference is sponsored by  S.M.A.R.T.,  a newsletter that examines the possible connections between ritual abuse and secretive organizations. E-mail:  SMARTNEWS@aol.com http://ritualabuse.us/

Survivorship is an international non-profit organization for survivors of sadistic sexual abuse, ritualistic abuse, mind control, and torture. The organization serves survivors, partners and other allies, therapists, clergy, and pro-survivor activists and advocates. Contact information: Survivorship, FJC,470 27th St., Oakland, Ca 94612 survivorshipstaff@yahoo.com http://www.survivorship.org

The Mission of the California Protective Parents Association is to protect children from incest and family violence through research, education and advocacy. California Protective Parents Association PO Box 15284   Sacramento CA 95851-0284 http://www.protectiveparents.com/   cppa001@aol.com

Persons Against Ritual Abuse-Torture – Jeanne Sarson and Linda MacDonald are human rights defenders who have been working for 18 years to expose different forms of non-state actor torture, including ritual abuse-torture. As independent scholars we are involved in participatory research and education and have internationally published articles. 361 Prince St., Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada, B2N 1E4  E-mail: flight@ns.sympatico.ca Website: http://nonstatetorture.org/
(Permission to forward this without header and trailers to pro-survivor groups and websites.)

S.M.A.R.T.  –  Copyright 2011 (Entire Pamphlet and conference name)  – All rights reserved, no reproduction of  any material  without  written  permission from S.M.A.R.T.

Memory disturbances and dissociative amnesia in Holocaust survivors

June 25, 2011 Comments Off on Memory disturbances and dissociative amnesia in Holocaust survivors

The excerpts below are from this website.
http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/scholarly-resources/holocaust/

The following articles provide compelling scientific evidence in support of the phenomena of dissociation and recovered memory in Holocaust survivors. In addition to supporting the phenomenon in general, these articles also counter the argument that recovered memory is (a) no more than a recent cultural “fad” and (b) specific to false accusers of sexual abuse.

DeWind, E. (1968). The confrontation with death. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 49, 302-305. Excerpt: “Most former inmates of Nazi concentration camps could not remember anything of the first days of imprisonment because perception of reality was so overwhelming that it would lead to a mental chaos which implies a certain death.”

Durlacher, G. L. (1991). De zoektocht [The search]. Amsterdam: Meulenhoff.
Dutch sociologist Durlacher, a survivor of Birkenau, describes his search for and meetings with another 20 child survivors from this camp. Excerpt: “Misha…looks helplessly at me and admits hesitantly that the period in the camps is wiped out from his brain….With each question regarding the period between December 12, 1942 till May 7, 1945, he admits while feeling embarrassed that he cannot remember anything.”

Jaffe, R. (1968). Dissociative phenomena in former concentration camp inmates. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 49(2), 310-312.
Case descriptions include amnesia for traumatic events and subsequent twilight states in which events would be relived without conscious awareness. Excerpt: “The dissociative phenomena described here turn out not to be rare, once one is on the look out for them.”

Keilson, H. (1992). Sequential traumatization in children. Jerusalem: The Magnes Press. Amnesia in Jewish Dutch child survivors for the traumatic separation from their parents.

Krell, R. (1993). Child survivors of the Holocaust: Strategies of adaptation. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 38, 384-389.
Excerpt: “The most pervasive preoccupation of child survivors is the continuing struggle with memory, whether there is too much or too little.”

Krystal, H., & Danieli, Y. (1994, Fall). Holocaust survivor studies in the context of PTSD. PTSD Research Quarterly, 5(4), 1-5.

Kuch, K., & Cox, B. J. (1992). Symptoms of PTSD in 124 survivors of the Holocaust. American Journal of Psychiatry, 149, 337-340.
Psychogenic amnesia was found in 3.2% of the totals sample, in 3.8 of the general concentration camp survivors, and in 10% of tattooed survivors of Auschwitz. 17.7% (N=22) of the total sample had received psychotherapy. The tattooed survivors had a higher number of PTSD symptoms overall.

Lagnado, L. M., & Dekel, S. C. (1991). Children of the flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the untold story of the twins of Auschwitz. New York: William and Morrow & Co.
Excerpt: “A few of the twins insisted that they had no memories of Auschwitz whatsoever.”

Laub, D., & Auerhahn, N. C. (1989). Failed empathy—A central theme in the survivor’s Holocaust experience. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 6(4), 377-400.
Excerpt: “Holocaust survivors remember their experiences through a prism of fragmentation and usually recount them only in fragments.”

Laub, D., & Auerhahn, N. C. (1993). Knowing and not knowing massive psychic trauma: Forms of traumatic memory. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 74, 287-302.
Excerpt: “Erecting barriers against knowing is often the first response to such trauma. Women in Nazi concentration camps dealt with difficult interrogation by the Gestapo by derealization, by asserting ‘I did not go through it. Somebody else went through the experience.’….Unintegrable memories endure as a split-off part, a cleavage in the ego…When the balance is such that the ego cannot deal with the experience, fragmentation occurs….Simply put, therapy with those impacted by trauma involves, in part, the reinstatement of the relationship between event, memory and personality.”

Marks, J. (1995). The hidden children: The secret survivors of the Holocaust. Toronto: Bantam Books.
Excerpt: “So much of my childhood between the ages of four and nine is blank….It’s almost as if my life was smashed into little pieces….The trouble is, when I try to remember, I come up with so little. This ability to forget was probably my way of surviving emotionally as a child.”

Mazor, A., Ganpel, Y., Enright, R. D., & Ornstein, R. (1990, January). Holocaust survivors: Coping with posttraumatic memories in childhood and 40 years later. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 3(1), 11-14.

Modai, I. (1994). Forgetting childhood: A defense mechanism against psychosis in a Holocaust survivor. In T. L. Brink (Ed.), Holocaust survivors’ mental health. New York: Haworth Press.
In a debate about uncovering painful memories of the Holocaust, Modai’s case is of a 58 year old woman who is unable to remember her childhood.

Moskovitz, S., & Krell, R. (1990). Child survivors of the Holocaust: Psychological adaptations to survival. Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Services, 27(2), 81-91.
Excerpt: “Whatever the memories, much is repressed as too fearful for recall, or suppressed by well-meaning caretakers wishing the child to forget.”

Musaph, H. (1993). Het post-concentratiekampsyndroom [The post-concentration camp syndrome]. Maandblad Geestelijke volksgezondheid [Dutch Journal of Mental Health], 28(5), 207-217.
Amnesia exists for certain Holocaust experiences, while other experiences are extremely well remembered.

Niederland, W. G. (1968). Clinical observations on the “survivor syndrome.” International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 49, 313-315.
Discusses memory disturbances such as amnesia and hypermnesia.

Stein, A. (1994). Hidden children: Forgotten survivors of the Holocaust. Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books.
Excerpt: “Over the years I have been trying to re-experience those feelings, but they kept eluding me. I was cut off from most of my memories, and from relieving the anxiety of that time….I remember nothing about the time I spent with those people…not a face, not a voice, not a piece of furniture.”

van Ravesteijn, L. (1976). Gelaagdheid van herinneringen [Layering of memories]. Tijdschrift boor Psychotherapie, 5(1), 195-205.

Wagenaar, W. A., & Groeneweg, J. (1990). The memory of concentration camp survivors. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 4, 77-87.

Abstract: This study is concerned with the question whether extremely emotional experiences, such as being the victim of Nazi concentration camps, leave traces in memory that cannot be extinguished. Relevant data were obtained from testimony by 78 witnesses in a case against Marinus De Rijke, who was accused of Nazi crimes in Camp Erika in The Netherlands. The testimonies were collected in the periods 1943–1947 and 1984–1987. A comparison between these two periods reveals the amount of forgetting that occurred in 40 years. Results show that camp experiences were generally well-remembered, although specific but essential details were forgotten. Among these were forgetting being maltreated, forgetting names and appearance of the torturers, and forgetting being a witness to murder. Apparently intensity of experiences is not a sufficient safeguard against forgetting.”

Wilson, J., Harel, Z., & Kahana, B. (1988). Human adaptation to extreme stress: From the Holocaust to Vietnam. New York: Plenum Press.

Yehuda, R., Elkin, A., Binder-Brynes, K., Kahana, B., Southwick, S. M., Schmeidler, J., & Giller, E. R., Jr. (1996, July). Dissociation in aging Holocaust survivors. American Journal of Psychiatry, 153(7), 935-940.

Yehuda, R., Schmeidler, J., Siever, L. J., Binder-Brynes, K., & Elkin, A. (1997). Individual differences in posttraumatic stress disorder symptom profiles in Holocaust survivors in concentration camps or in hiding. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 10, 453-465.
46% of 100 survivors report amnesia on PTSD measures.

http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/scholarly-resources/holocaust/

Delaware ex-pediatrician guilty of child sex abuse, 24 counts of rape, assault

June 25, 2011 Comments Off on Delaware ex-pediatrician guilty of child sex abuse, 24 counts of rape, assault

describes graphic crimes

Delaware ex-pediatrician guilty of child sex abuse

By Dan Shortridge, The (Wilmington, Del.) News Journal
6/23/11 GEORGETOWN, Del.

A Delaware pediatrician was found guilty Thursday of raping and abusing his child patients.

Earl Bradley, 58, accused of raping or assaulting more than 100 girls he treated, was convicted of all 24 counts of rape, assault and sexual exploitation that he faced in Sussex Superior Court here.

The verdict was expected: Evidence of the attacks included videos that he recorded and Bradley’s lawyers did not mount any defense. Instead, they are expected to appeal an earlier ruling from Judge William Carpenter Jr. that 13 hours of videos seized from Bradley’s office was admissible.

A state police detective who viewed the videos said during the trial that Bradley used mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on a few girls who were “ashen gray” from choking and suffocation after he forced them to perform oral sex on him.

The videos also show children in diapers screaming as they attempt in vain to escape from their doctor before he rapes them in an outbuilding at his office where he took children for candy and toys. In one case at his home, a video shows Bradley using nitrous oxide to keep a sleeping 7-year-old girl sedate during his attack, police testified.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2011-06-23-delaware-pediatrician-sex-abuse_n.htm

Martha Marcy May Marlene – A Devastating Portrait of Cult Brainwashing

June 24, 2011 Comments Off on Martha Marcy May Marlene – A Devastating Portrait of Cult Brainwashing

Un Certain Regard – Martha Marcy May Marlene By Peter Debruge Jan. 22, 2011
A young woman looking for somewhere to belong finds it difficult to readjust to society after escaping life with a cult in “Martha Marcy May Marlene,” a sensitive treatment of a sensational subject that heralds the arrival of talented tyro Sean Durkin behind the camera and promising new star Elizabeth Olsen. Picking up as its heroine breaks free and then using uneasy flashbacks to suggest the character’s lingering paranoia, Durkin’s effective yet frustratingly obtuse feature debut — a sister project to his short “Mary Last Seen” — invites contemplation while withholding the narrative drive needed to break out beyond, yes, cult status. http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117944343/

‘Martha Marcy May Marlene’ – A Devastating Portrait of Cult Brainwashing [Sundance Review]
….Martha Marcy May Marlene tells the story of Martha (Elizabeth Olsen), a woman who escapes from a cult in rural New York and tries to reintegrate into a normal life with her sister, Lucy (Sarah Paulson). Lucy brings Martha to her Connecticut vacation home, where she and her husband Adam (Hugh Dancy) are trying to enjoy a few days away from their regular lives in the city. Martha constantly experiences chilling flashbacks and begins to lose her grip on reality. As the days pass and Martha’s behavior becomes more and more erratic, it becomes clear that her time away from home may have had far more effects on her than initially believed. http://www.slashfilm.com/martha-marcy-may-marlene-review/

movie trailer
IMDb Video  Martha Marcy May Marlene
(shows violent scenes)
Haunted by painful memories and increasing paranoia, a damaged woman struggles to re-assimilate with her family after fleeing an abusive cult. http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi1493409049/

Traumatic memory: memory disturbances and dissociative amnesia

June 23, 2011 Comments Off on Traumatic memory: memory disturbances and dissociative amnesia

The following articles provide compelling scientific evidence in support of the phenomena of dissociation and recovered memory.

Included are cases involving survivors of childhood abuse, survivors of the Holocaust, and war veterans.

In addition to supporting the phenomenon in general, these articles also counter the argument that recovered memory is (a) no more than a recent cultural “fad” and (b) specific to false accusers of sexual abuse.

http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/scholarly-resources/traumatic-memory/

excerpts:
Bremner, J. D., Krystal, J. H., Charney, D. S., & Southwick, S. M. (1996). Neural mechanisms in dissociative amnesia for childhood abuse: Relevance to the current controversy surrounding the “false memory syndrome.” The American Journal of Psychiatry, 153, 71-82.

….CONCLUSIONS: John Nemiah pointed out several years ago that alterations in memory in the form of dissociative amnesia are an important part of exposure to traumatic stressors, such as childhood abuse. The studies reviewed here show that extreme stress has long-term effects on memory. These findings may provide a model for understanding the mechanisms involved in dissociative amnesia, as well as a rationale for phenomena such as delayed recall of childhood abuse.

….Briere, J., & Conte, J. R. (1993, January). Self-reported amnesia for abuse in adults molested as children. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 6(1), 21-31.

….A sample of 450 adult clinical subjects reporting sexual abuse histories were studied regarding their repression of sexual abuse incidents. A total of 267 subjects (59.3%) identified some period in their lives, before age 18, when they had no memory of their abuse. Variables most predictive of abuse-related amnesia were greater current psychological symptoms, molestation at an early age, extended abuse, and variables reflecting especially violent abuse

….Chu, J. A., Frey, L. M., Ganzel, B. L., & Matthews, J. A. (1999, May). Memories of childhood abuse: Dissociation, amnesia, and corroboration. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 156(5), 749-755.

….Childhood abuse, particularly chronic abuse beginning at early ages, is related to the development of high levels of dissociative symptoms including amnesia for abuse memories. This study strongly suggests that psychotherapy usually is not associated with memory recovery and that independent corroboration of recovered memories of abuse is often present.

….DeWind, E. (1968). The confrontation with death. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 49, 302-305.

Excerpt: “Most former inmates of Nazi concentration camps could not remember anything of the first days of imprisonment because perception of reality was so overwhelming that it would lead to a mental chaos which implies a certain death.”

….Durlacher, G. L. (1991). De zoektocht [The search]. Amsterdam: Meulenhoff.

Dutch sociologist Durlacher, a survivor of Birkenau, describes his search for and meetings with another 20 child survivors from this camp. Excerpt: “Misha….looks helplessly at me and admits hesitantly that the period in the camps is wiped out from his brain….With each question regarding the period between December 12, 1942 till May 7, 1945, he admits while feeling embarrassed that he cannot remember anything….Jindra…had to admit that he remembers almost nothing from his years in the camps….From the winter months of 1944 until just before the liberation in April 1945, only two words stayed with him: Dora and Nordhausen

….Elliott, D. M., & Briere, J. (1995, October). Posttraumatic stress associated with delayed recall of sexual abuse: A general population study. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 8(4), 629-647. (Child Abuse Crisis Center, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA.)

Abstract: This study examined delayed recall of childhood sexual abuse in a stratified random sample of the general population (N = 505). Of participants who reported a history of sexual abuse, 42% described some period of time when they had less memory of the abuse than they did at the time of data collection. No demographic differences were found between subjects with continuous recall and those who reported delayed recall. However, delayed recall was associated with the use of threats at the time of the abuse.

….Feldman-Summers, S., Pope, K. S. (1994, June). The experience of “forgetting” childhood abuse: A national survey of psychologists. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 62(3), 636-639.

Abstract: A national sample of psychologists were asked whether they had been abused as children and, if so, whether they had ever forgotten some or all of the abuse. Almost a quarter of the sample (23.9%) reported childhood abuse, and of those, approximately 40% reported a period of forgetting some or all of the abuse. The major findings were that (1) both sexual and nonsexual abuse were subject to periods of forgetting; (2) the most frequently reported factor related to recall was being in therapy; (3) approximately one half of those who reported forgetting also reported corroboration of the abuse….

Herman, J. L., & Harvey, M. R. (1997). Adult memories of childhood trauma: a naturalistic clinical study. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 10(4), 557-571.

Abstract: The clinical evaluations of 77 adult psychiatric outpatients reporting memories of childhood trauma were reviewed. A majority of patients reported some degree of continuous recall. Roughly half (53%) said they had never forgotten the traumatic events. Two smaller groups described a mixture of continuous and delayed recall (17%) or a period of complete amnesia followed by delayed recall (16%).

….Krell, R. (1993). Child survivors of the Holocaust: Strategies of adaptation. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 38, 384-389.

Excerpt: “The most pervasive preoccupation of child survivors is the continuing struggle with memory, whether there is too much or too little….For a child survivor today, an even more vexing problem is the intrusion of fragments of memory—most are emotionally powerful and painful but make no sense. They seem to become more frequent with time and are triggered by thousands of subtle or not so subtle events

….Kuch, K., & Cox, B. J. (1992). Symptoms of PTSD in 124 survivors of the Holocaust. American Journal of Psychiatry, 149, 337-340.

Potential subjects with confirmed or suspected organicity, bipolar or obsessive compulsive disorder were excluded. One group (N=78) had been detained in various concentration camps for greater than 1 month. A second group (N=20) had been detained in Auschwitz and had been tattooed. A third group (N=45) had not been in labor camps, ghettos, or had hidden in the illegal underground. Psychogenic amnesia was found in 3.2% of the totals sample, in 3.8 of the general concentration camp survivors, and in 10% of tattooed survivors of Auschwitz. 17.7% (N=22) of the total sample had received psychotherapy.

….Loftus, E. F., Polonsky, S., & Fullilove, M. T. (1994, March). Memories of childhood sexual abuse: Remembering and repressing. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 18(1), 67-84. (University of Washington, Psychology Department, Seattle, WA.)

Abstract: Women involved in outpatient treatment for substance abuse were interviewed to examine their recollections of childhood sexual abuse. Overall, 54% of the 105 women reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. Of these, the majority (81%) remembered all or part of the abuse their whole lives; 19% reported they forgot the abuse for a period of time, and later the memory returned.

….Melchert, T. P. (1996, October). Childhood memory and a history of different forms of abuse. Professional Psychology: Research & Practice, 27(5), 438-446. (Texas Tech University, Department of Psychology, Lubbock, TX.)

Abstract: A widespread professional and public controversy has recently emerged regarding recovered memories of child sexual abuse, but the prevalence and nature of these memories have received limited empirical examination. This study (N = 553 nonclinical participants) found that very similar proportions of those with histories of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse reported that they had periods without memory of their abuse (21%, 18%, and 18%, respectively).

….Musaph, H. (1993). Het post-concentratiekampsyndroom [The post-concentration camp syndrome]. Maandblad Geestelijke volksgezondheid [Dutch Journal of Mental Health], 28(5), 207-217.

Amnesia exists for certain Holocaust experiences, while other experiences are extremely well remembered.

….van der Hart, O., Bolt, H., & van der Kolk, B. A. (2005). Memory fragmentation in dissociative identity disorder. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 6(1), 55-70. (Department of Clinical Psychology, Utrecht University, the Netherlands.)

Abstract: This study examined the quality of self-reported memories of traumatic experiences in participants with dissociative identity disorder (DID) and compared them with their memories of non-traumatic, but emotionally significant life experiences. Systematic interview data were gathered from 30 DID patients in The Netherlands. All participants reported a history of severe childhood abuse; 93.3% reported some period of amnesia for the index traumatic event, and 33.3% reported periods of amnesia for significant non-traumatic childhood experiences. All participants who had been amnestic for their trauma reported that their memories were initially retrieved in the form of somatosensory flashbacks. This suggests that, like PTSD patients, DID patients at least initially recall their trauma not as a narrative, but as somatosensory re-experiencing.

….Wagenaar, W. A., & Groeneweg, J. (1990). The memory of concentration camp survivors. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 4, 77-87.

Abstract: This study is concerned with the question whether extremely emotional experiences, such as being the victim of Nazi concentration camps, leave traces in memory that cannot be extinguished. Relevant data were obtained from testimony by 78 witnesses in a case against Marinus De Rijke, who was accused of Nazi crimes in Camp Erika in The Netherlands. The testimonies were collected in the periods 1943–1947 and 1984–1987. A comparison between these two periods reveals the amount of forgetting that occurred in 40 years. Results show that camp experiences were generally well-remembered, although specific but essential details were forgotten. Among these were forgetting being maltreated, forgetting names and appearance of the torturers, and forgetting being a witness to murder.

….Williams, L. M. (1994, December). Recall of childhood trauma: A prospective study of women’s memories of child sexual abuse. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 62(6), 1167-1176. (University of New Hampshire, Family Research Lab, Durham, NH.)

Abstract: One hundred twenty-nine women with previously documented histories of sexual victimization in childhood were interviewed and asked detailed questions about their abuse histories to answer the question “Do people actually forget traumatic events such as child sexual abuse, and if so, how common is such forgetting?” A large proportion of the women (38%) did not recall the abuse that had been reported 17 years earlier. Women who were younger at the time of the abuse and those who were molested by someone they knew were more likely to have no recall of the abuse.

….Yehuda, R., Schmeidler, J., Siever, L. J., Binder-Brynes, K., & Elkin, A. (1997). Individual differences in posttraumatic stress disorder symptom profiles in Holocaust survivors in concentration camps or in hiding. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 10, 453-465.

46% of 100 survivors report amnesia on PTSD measures.
http://blogs.brown.edu/recoveredmemory/scholarly-resources/traumatic-memory/

Where Am I?

You are currently viewing the archives for June, 2011 at Eassurvey's Weblog.